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I'm making a simple navigation with jQuery that loads content panes by showing or hiding them on the page. I am using anchor tags to determine which pane to show. I also use a "ready" function to show the #hash element when the page is loaded. Pretty basic:

$(document).ready(function() {
  $('#video_form_content > div').hide();
  var showTab = window.location.hash || "#basic-info";
  $(showTab).show();
}

$('#video_form_tabs li').on('click', function() {
    $('#video_form_content > div').hide();
    var target = $(this).children('a').attr('href');
    $(target).show();
})

What's happening, though, is that when the elements are clicked, the page jumps to the top of the target div. I don't want this jump, but I do want to keep the default functionality of the anchor tag in the sense that I want the hash added to the URL so that refreshing would reopen the same tab.

Here's what I've tried

  • Adding $(window).scrollTop(0) to the click event. I thought it might, but this event fires before the actual navigation of the anchor element, so it's immediately undone.
  • Adding $(window).scrollTop(0) to $(document).ready() However, this listener is not fired when clicking an anchor for the same page.
  • Adding window.location.hash = target or window.location.href = target to the click event. However, this still causes the resubmission of the page, and it still "jumps".
  • Adding return false to the function. This prevents adding the hash to the URL, which is highly preferred.

This is really baffling me, and any help would be much appreciated.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Identify your target divs with things like #basic-info-TAB, then add "-TAB" to the target variable.

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Great suggestion, but this still causes a jump to the top of the page if the user is already scrolled some. +1 because I didn't think about trying that yet –  Kyle Macey Feb 5 '12 at 3:40
    
Ended up going this way –  Kyle Macey Feb 5 '12 at 21:44

You should attach the event to the anchor and cancel the default event handler:

$(document).ready(function() {
  $('#video_form_content > div').hide();
  var showTab = window.location.hash || "#basic-info";
  $(showTab).show();
}

$('#video_form_tabs li a').on('click', function(e) {
    e.preventDefault(); // stop browser from following href
    $('#video_form_content > div').hide();
    var target = $(this).attr('href');
    $(target).show();
})
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Also having onclick="return false;" would prevent the default handler. –  sinemetu1 Feb 5 '12 at 3:52
    
Except this doesn't add the hash to the end of the URL. And I already tried the return false, but that was a negative. –  Kyle Macey Feb 5 '12 at 3:55
    
To prevent scrolling, you would have to set it to a non existing id and rebuild it later or, in alternative, use the HTML5 History API. Have a look at stackoverflow.com/questions/3090478/jquery-hash-change-event –  Bruno Silva Feb 5 '12 at 4:03

If you want to retain the hash in the url, you have to manually add it

e.preventDefault(); // stop browser from following href
var url = $(this).prop('href'); // get href
var hash = url.split('#'); // get the hash-part
if(hash.length > 1) location.hash = hash[1]; // rewrite the url

I've only tested this in Chrome and it works great there.

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I ran into this problem today aswell, and used a workaround for this problem, using divs with css fixed position on top like so:

.anchordiv {
  position: fixed;
  line-height: 0px;
  height: 0px;
  top: 7px; /* Correcting for some offset */
}

Then for each achor add a div with a link:

<div class='anchordiv'>
   <a name='anchorname'>&nbsp;</a>
</div>

This makes sure the page always scrolls to the position of the anchor div, which is fixed to the top of the location of the browser window, cancelling the effect.

Then you can do the scrolling the way Kolink suggested it.

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My method is to add a common class to the clickable elements, then do a setTimeout with a timeout of 0. In my case I added the class of "top" to my clickable elements.

$(".top").click(function(){
    setTimeout(function(){
        window.scrollTo(0, 0);
    }, 0);
})

You can set the x and y coordinates to whatever you like:

scrollTo(X, Y);

Quick and easy!

Do this to keep the current scroll position:

$(".top").click(function(){
    var position = $(document).scrollTop();
    setTimeout(function(){
        window.scrollTo(0, position);
    }, 0);
})
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