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Really I guess I am looking for a best practice answer. I like to leave applications with the lightest amount of code possible and the least amount of repeated code especially. I have a few Android applications that I have created. My question is, if I create a new Activity which in turn also needs a class to be created of a similar name, should I create the class separate or is there some way that I can keep the class that extends the Activity already?

Here is an example, lets say I want to create a small activity that is related to Pinging an Address. I could implement Parcelable on that Activity and use my Activity as a data holder Class.

public class PingAddress extends Activity implements Parcelable{
public String Scan;
public String ScanName;
public String IpAddress;
public String Timeout;
public String NumberOfPings;

public PingAddress() {

}
    public void onCreate(Bundle bundle) { 
        super.onCreate(bundle);
    }

What I have been doing is just creating the activity and then creating a separate class, using the example above, called PingAddressData, here is an example of that class.

public class PingAddressData implements Parcelable{
public String Scan;
public String ScanName;
public String IpAddress;
public String Timeout;
public String NumberOfPings;

public PingAddress() {

} 

Again, I am really looking for best practice here with Android. Does anyone know of repercussions that I would run into if I just implemented Parcelable on an Activity? My main objective is to cut down on code pages. I created a separate Package just to store all of the data classes in that I created, but were really a representation of that Activity.

Thanks

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Also too, I am concerned that if I try to do something like new PingAddress(). That I will in turn, in the background, create a new Activity also. – meanbunny Feb 5 '12 at 4:58
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm not sure about a "best practice", but it is certainly a good idea to keep your Parceable separate than the Activity. If you do make your Activity Parceable and pass it through an Intent you risk keeping references to Activites past and thus open yourself up for memory leaks.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok awesome thanks! Oddly enough, without fail, I was able to create a new instance of my PingAddress like so, even with it extends Activity and Parcelable enabled on the class. PingAddress test = new PingAddress(); I am curious now if I just created a class called Data inside of my PingAddress Activity if that would suffice. I think the flow would make more sense and I wouldnt be recreating an Activity each time. – meanbunny Feb 5 '12 at 5:45
    
I guess really I would just have extra null objects inside of the new object itself. Which shouldn't lead to too much memory leak. – meanbunny Feb 5 '12 at 5:48
    
Hmmm, I guess I never tried to instantiate an activity myself. Always assumed that you couldn't do it. Editing my answer to remove false information – John Ericksen Feb 5 '12 at 5:56
    
Ive noticed that many android developers like to put their entire set of business logic into one flat Activity, claiming performance. I think this is a bad practice and goes against basic Object Oriented design. – John Ericksen Feb 5 '12 at 6:00
    
Yeah I agree with you there. It just seems like there is a lot of repetition with Android in the coding style. I personally like to have a separate file but if I could get away with not having one then I would. Thanks for your help on this, any other feedback is greatly appreciated from other folks. – meanbunny Feb 5 '12 at 6:24

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