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I am making a program in which I am inheriting publicly my Set class from a built-in STL container class set. I have to use the iterator type, while making some other specialized functions for my own Set class, as defined in the stl set class.

Now my question is: What would be the syntax to declare variables of iterator type inside my member functions? I have been trying:

  template<typename T>
  class Set : public set<T> {
         public:
         bool func()
         {
            iterator it,it2;
         }
   };

But the compiler is not recognizing iterator type. Kindly tell me the syntax to use the iterator type from the stl set class.

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2  
"iam inheriting publicly my Set class from a built-in STL container class 'set'"? Stop right there! Why are you doing this? –  Johnsyweb Feb 5 '12 at 5:09
    
Iam making DFA program, hence set functionalities could be useful in it. I have no intention to use it polymorphically. –  Zohaib Feb 5 '12 at 5:11
2  
@Zohaib: Then make set<T> a class member of Set. Prefer composition over inheritance. If you're not using it polymorphically, then there's no point in using inheritance. –  In silico Feb 5 '12 at 5:13
    
But i have to do it this way, since i have got a prototype of this program as my homework, and i have to implement it in the same way. –  Zohaib Feb 5 '12 at 5:16
    
Did a teacher seriously give a prototype of template<typename T> class Set : public set<T> in a homework exercise? Wow! –  Johnsyweb Feb 5 '12 at 5:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The compiler complains because it doesn't know that iterator is in fact a member of set<T>. set<T> is what's called a dependent type, because it depends on the type parameter T. In a nutshell, the compiler does not look inside dependent names when resolving types.

This FAQ entry is relevant to this question. Also, be sure to read through the answers to this Stack Overflow question. To fix it, use typename.

template<typename T> 
class Set : public set<T> { 
public: 
    bool func() 
    { 
        typename set<T>::iterator it;
        typename set<T>::iterator it2; 
    } 
}; 

But really, you should be using composition instead of inheritnace for this case, like this:

template<typename T>
class Set
{
public:
    bool func()
    {
        typename set<T>::iterator it;
        typename set<T>::iterator it2;
    }
private:
    std::set<T> set;
};
share|improve this answer
    
That fixed the problem, thnx alot. –  Zohaib Feb 5 '12 at 5:24

You should never ever ever ever ever inherit from an STL container class because the destructors of those classes are not virtual, and so every time you instantiate an instance of your derived class, you'll have a memory leak.

As In Silico suggested in one of his comments, give Set a member variable set instead of inheriting from it.

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but if i am not using virtual functions, then??? –  Zohaib Feb 5 '12 at 5:13
    
@Zohaib it doesn't matter, you'll still have a leak, don't ever do it. –  Seth Carnegie Feb 5 '12 at 5:14
    
@Zohaib: if you want to reutilise Standard library container for building your own then you must in a has-a relationship a.k.a composition instead of Inheritance. –  Alok Save Feb 5 '12 at 5:16
1  
IMHO, there are way too many "ever"s here. For instance, private unheritance can be just fine. Same goes for public inheritance if you don't delete it polymorphically. In fact, you're saying wrong things here. Just creating objects and using them normally is totally fine. I'd still recommend private inheritance, so access through the base class doesn't accidentally bypass your class' invariants. However, inheritance is a great tool even for STL containers, since you don't need to replicate all the member functions. Use what's fitting for the job. –  Xeo Feb 5 '12 at 6:52
1  
Yes, very much so! A child class destructor always calls the parent class destructor automatically (well, except if it throws an exception I think), no matter if it's virtual or not. It's the child class destructor that never gets called if you delete the object through a base-class pointer (which is also UB IIRC). –  Xeo Feb 5 '12 at 18:05

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