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My multi-level MVCGrid/MVCForm/MVCGrid saga continues....

I am using nested MVCGrids with expander buttons that invoke MVCForms to perform different data operations. ALL mySQL tables in this process have an "id" data element and that is the primary key for each table. Each mySQL table also has a point to its parent when necessary using _id naming convention. All of the foreign-keys have been setup in mySQL to work this way as well.

The model for the parent is like this:

class Model_uidcontrol extends Model_Table {

public $entity_code='uidcontrol';
public $table_alias='uc';

function init(){
    parent::init();

The model for the child is like this:

class Model_uiddetails extends Model_Table {

public $entity_code='uiddetails';
public $table_alias='ud';
function init(){
    parent::init();

Each model has its own "id" and a pointer to its parent.

The expander column in the MVCGrid (parent) invokes this child function:

$um=$this->add('MVCForm');

$um->setModel('uiddetails')
    ->loadData(($_GET['uidcontrol_id']));

I have tried this in the child model:

    $this->addRelatedEntity('uc','uidcontrol','uidcontrol_ID');

and this as well:

$this->addField('uidcontrol_id')
->refModel('Model_uidcontrol')
        ->caption('System Info')
        ->visible(true);

I've tried each technique separately and together to get child records to be coordinated with the proper parent.

debug() shows this

where

ud.id = '121'
ud.uidcontrol_id = '121'

OK, I understand the $GET and how it works and how that relates to dsql - at least I think I do.

What I can't figure out is how to tell MVCForm to use "ud.uidcontrol_id = '121 " that come via the $GET when building the dsql for data loading and not use 'ud.id'

In the above example, there is a parent record "uidcontrol" with that id. I forced the 'id' of the child record to be 121 to see if it would pull data and display it in the form. OK, data displays as it should.

When I try this parent whose 'id' = 10, debug() produces this

ud.id = '10'
ud.uidcontrol_id = '10'

and no data is returned. There is a uidcontrol record with id = 10 but the dsql is trying to match to ud.id = 10 as well.

I can post more of what I am working to clarify what I am trying to do if that helps.

Ideally, I would like to tell MVCForm "Hey! Don't use the 'id' data element when building the dsql, use the one I am supplying instead. Problem is, I can't figure out how to do that... but I've learned a bunch along the way. Me thinks that I am probably "over thinking" something here.

Thanks for any suggestions!

Monday Feb 6th Notes:

var_dump($_GET); says:

'id' => string '10' (length=2) <=== uidcontrol.id 'uidcontrol_id' => string '10' (length=2) <=== uidcontrol.id

I write this:

$um->setModel('uiddetails')
    ->addCondition('uidcontrol_id',($_GET['id']))
    ->loadData(($_GET['id']));

And the SQL debug shows this being built:

where

ud.id = '10'
ud.uidcontrol_id = '10'

The issue is that I want ONLY " ud.uidcontrol_id = '10' ". Table uiddetails has its own id of 125 and a uidcontrol_id value of 10. As a result of that, the query doesn't return a record.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

The loadData method only loads records by their id. To link the "child" model through his referenced record you must use setMasterField or addCondition to instruct the model to filter on the relationship.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand what you wrote but the issue I am having is that "addCondition" is appending to the qualifier: $um->setModel('uiddetails') ->addCondition('uidcontrol_id',($_GET['uidcontrol_id'])) ->loadData(($_GET['uidcontrol_id'])); –  WhoAte TheMachine Feb 6 '12 at 13:52
    
You don't need to use loadData at all! The condition is the one that identifies the child record. –  The Elter Feb 6 '12 at 16:27
    
After a lot more work it seems that MVCForm is going to use the 'id' field as a condition no matter what. "setMasterField" appends to the existing condition instead of replacing it. –  WhoAte TheMachine Feb 7 '12 at 21:07

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