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This is my second question on this site and both of them deal with 'if' statements not working as expected. I've been learning Python for about 3-4 months and I remember back at the beginning when i was learning 'for', 'if's and 'while's I remember thinking that the 'if' statement is the simplest of the three; I'm starting to come to the realization that 'if' statements aren't as clear cut as I once thought.

I'm writing a converter that converts between binary, decimal and hex without using any Python built-in math functions. I am using tkinter.

The problem I will ask about deals with when the convert from 'binary' radio button is selected. below the 3 'convert from' radio buttons are 3 'convert to' check boxes. The following code is meant to convert from binary to decimal if the dec_bttn checkbox is checked and to hex if the hex_bttn checkbox is selected:

def from_binary(self, dec_bttn, hex_bttn):
    """ Performs conversion from base2 to base10 and base16. """
    bits = '1010'               #actual code used -> self.input_str.get()
    exp =  len(bits) -1         #actual code used -> len(self.input_str.get()) - 1

    # operate on valid string
    # converts to decimal
    if self.dec_bttn:           
        dtot = 0
        while exp >= 1:
            for i in bits[:-1]:
                if i == "1":
                    dtot += 2**exp
                elif i == "0":
                    dtot = dtot                        
                exp -= 1

            if bits[-1] == "1":
                dtot += 1

            self.output_disp.delete(0.0, END)
            self.output_disp.insert(0.0, dtot)


    # convert to hex

    elif self.hex_bttn:
        hex_digits = {
                      10: 'a', 11: 'b',
                      12: 'c', 13: 'd',
                      14: 'e', 15: 'f'
                      }
        string_length = len(bits)
        exp = len(bits) - 1
        if string_length <= 4:
            htot = 0
            while exp >= 1:
                for i in bits[:-1]:
                    if i == "1":
                        htot += 2**exp
                    elif i == "0":
                        htot = htot                        
                    exp -= 1

                if bits[-1] == "1":
                    htot += 1

            for i in hex_digits.keys():
                if i == htot:
                    htot = hex_digits[i]
                else:
                    htot = htot

            self.output_disp.delete(0.0, END)
            self.output_disp.insert(0.0, htot)

I have posted the entire 'from_binary' method. This is probably slightly more than needed but alittle too much is better than neglecting any amount.

Because I have to eventually break the string up into half byte strings for the hex conversion it is set up now as <= 4. So I am only testing it using 4 bits strings.

As it stands right now, using 'elif self.hex_bttn' it converts binary to decimal regardless of which checkbox is selected. If I change that to 'if self.hex_bttn' then it converts to hex regardless of which checkbox is selected.

The math and everything works right and outputs correctly. Its just the mix up with these 'if' statements that is holding up my progress. To my beginners mind it seems like a fairly straightforward test, but I am obviously missing something.

I would greatly appreciate if someone could put me on the right path.

Blessings F.

share|improve this question
2  
What does print self.hex_bttn output? if statements default to True if the expression is not explicitly false ([], {}, 0, False, None, ''). –  Blender Feb 5 '12 at 5:27
    
Leaving it as is: elif self.hex_bttn I tried that in 3 postition. 1) at the end of the method outside both if blocks and got PY_VAR2. 2) Immediately after the elif self.hex_bttn and got nothing in return. and 3) immediately after if self.dec_bttn and got PY_VAR2 again. –  Icsilk Feb 5 '12 at 5:39
    
What is the value of self.hex_bttn? –  Blender Feb 5 '12 at 5:40
    
I have them both set as BooleanVar(). Which means that I am in the belief that if one is selected that means True and not selected = False. –  Icsilk Feb 5 '12 at 5:42
1  
Try if self.het_bttn.get(). –  Blender Feb 5 '12 at 5:43

2 Answers 2

It sounds like you self.dec_bttn and self.hex_bttn evaluate to true, probably because, as @voithos says, you should .get() the values from the objects.

Here is a perfectly serviceable binary-string-to-number converter:

def binary_to_number(binary_string):
    total = 0
    for c in binary_string:
        total = total * 2 + (c == "1")
    return total

Then your code could be like this:

def binary_to_number(binary_string):
    total = 0
    for c in binary_string:
        total = total * 2 + (c == "1")
    return total

def binary_to_decimal(binary_string):
    return str(binary_to_number(binary_string))

def binary_to_hex(binary_string):
    hex_digits = {
        10: 'a', 11: 'b',
        12: 'c', 13: 'd',
        14: 'e', 15: 'f'
    }
    tot = binary_to_number(bits)
    return str(hex_digits.get(tot, tot))

if self.dec_bttn.get():           
    self.output_disp.delete(0.0, END)
    self.output_disp.insert(0.0, binary_to_decimal(bits))

elif self.hex_bttn.get():
    self.output_disp.delete(0.0, END)
    self.output_disp.insert(0.0, binary_to_hex(bits))
share|improve this answer

The if statement, and it's complement elif, work on Boolean values. If a variable, or whatever is being tested, is not Boolean already, then it is coerced and understood in a true/false fashion.

Any object that is non-zero, and not empty, is interpreted as being "True". So, assuming that dec_bttn and hex_bttn are Tkinter checkboxes, then Python is checking the Boolean value of the checkboxes themselves and, seeing that they are true, proceeds to execute the first if block every time.

Somewhere in your code you're probably initializing the Tkinter checkboxes like this:

self.dec_bttn = Checkbutton(root, Text='To decimal', ... )
self.hex_bttn = Checkbutton(root, Text='To hex', ... )

Instead of initializing them like this, you need to have variables that can store the "checked" state of the checkboxes, like so:

self.dec_checked = IntVar()
self.hex_checked = IntVar()

self.dec_bttn = Checkbutton(root, Text='To decimal',
                    variable=self.dec_checked, ... )
self.hex_bttn = Checkbutton(root, Text='To hex',
                    variable=self.hex_checked, ... )

Notice the IntVar. That is where the value is stored. But, you don't have to use IntVar, you can also use BooleanVar, or any other Tkinter variable type, in fact.

But, I digress, I see that you're already using a BooleanVar. So, most of this you already knew. But, the reason why just checking self.dec_bttn doesn't work is because dec_bttn is an object, not just a simple Boolean value.

Use self.dec_bttn.get() in your if statement to check the states of the checkboxes.

Check out the Tkinter reference for some other methods that are associated with the Tkinter variable types.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I had them set as self.dec_bttn = BooleanVar() etc. I just changed the all (self.bin_bttn, self.dec_bttn and self.hex_bttn) to IntVar() and am getting the same result. –  Icsilk Feb 5 '12 at 5:49
    
@Icsilk: As Blender mentioned, you need to use the .get() method of the variable objects. And, you can use BooleanVar if you'd like. –  voithos Feb 5 '12 at 5:52
    
It is working now, thank you very much for your time and effort –  Icsilk Feb 5 '12 at 5:54

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