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I can't figure out why this program won't work. I'm sure it's something basic.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
class MyPoint
{
    int x;
    int y;
public:
    MyPoint()
    {
        x = 0;
        y = 0;
    }

    MyPoint(int newX, int newY)
    {
        x = newX;
        y = newY;
    }

    int getX()
    { 
        return x;
    }

    int getY()
    {
        return y;
    }

    int distance(MyPoint newPoint)
    {
      distance = x - newPoint.getX();//need absolute value function
      return distance;
    };

  int main()
  {
    MyPoint point1(0,0);
    MyPoint point2(5,5);

    cout << "THe distance between the two circles is " << point1.distance(point2) << endl;

    return 0;
  }

I'm trying to find the distance between two points and just to test to make sure that I am using classes correctly. I am just using the x point only. Right now the code will not compile.

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1  
What error does the compiler give you? – w.donahue Feb 5 '12 at 7:22
    
In the future, you should paste the compiler error. – Donald Miner Feb 5 '12 at 7:24
    
Hey just an extra advice. Make sure to always have a correct indenting scheme in your code and to use the braces correctly to help you understand the flow of your code. – Lefteris Feb 5 '12 at 7:27
1  
If it's a compilation error, it is probably something basic. Understanding what your compiler and linker tell you is a fundamental part of programming. What did you do to try to do to fix the error when your compiler told you there was a problem? – Johnsyweb Feb 5 '12 at 7:43
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your problem lies in the distance function:

int distance(MyPoint newPoint)
{
  distance = x - newPoint.getX();//need absolute value function
  return distance;
};

Here, you have a variable named distance, which is not declared anywhere, and also is overloaded with the function name. Instead, you need to declare a new local variable and then return it, or just return it right away:

Option 1:

int distance(MyPoint newPoint)
{
  int d = x - newPoint.getX(); // renamed d, adding int
  return d;
};

Option 2:

int distance(MyPoint newPoint)
{
  return x - newPoint.getX();
};
share|improve this answer

Now, your first problem here is that main is inside the class - you forgot a close brace after the distance function. You've got the semicolon for ending the class description, but you have in total one close-brace too few.

Your second problem is that you're using a variable named distance inside a function named distance. Don't make name collisions, they make kittens cry.

Your third problem is that the distance variable that I just mentioned should be of type int.

As another piece of general advice, compilers give you error messages when your code doesn't compile. Posting those is helpful.

share|improve this answer

1) Close brace after distance function.
2) Implementation of distance function is not correct.

If you really want it to calc distance between two points, you should write something like:

double distance(MyPoint newPoint)
{
  double distance;
  distance=sqrt((x-newPoint.getX())*(x-newPoint.getX())
                    +(y-newPoint.getY())*(y-newPoint.getY()));
  return distance;
}

It'll find distance using Pythagorean theorem.
1) declaration of variable distance with type double.
2) calculating distance using Pythagorean theorem.
3) returning value of variable.

share|improve this answer

You have a mistake in the braces.

The code below runs correctly: (EDIT) - added an abs as correctly pointed out by AIs

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
class MyPoint
{
int x;
int y;
public:
MyPoint()
{
    x = 0;
    y = 0;
}

MyPoint(int newX, int newY)
{
    x = newX;
    y = newY;
}

int getX()
{
    return x;
}

int getY()
{
    return y;
}

int distance(MyPoint newPoint)
{
  return abs(newPoint.getX() - x);//need absolute value function

}
};

int main()
{
MyPoint point1(0,0);
MyPoint point2(5,5);

cout << "THe distance between the two circles is " << point1.distance(point2) << endl;

return 0;
}
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