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Below is the thought of Freeing Objects in Delphi's TStrings Items by Zarko Gajic at at About.com.delphi I am using Delphi 7, TStringList does not have OwnsObjects.

Running the following code will prompt EaccessViolation error. I donot know why and how to walk around it to free objects.

Thanks a lot.

procedure TForm6.freelist(const alist: TStringList);
var
  i: integer;
begin
  try
    for i:=0 to pred(alist.Count) do begin
      if Assigned(alist.Objects[i]) then begin
        alist.Objects[i].Free;       
        alist.objects[i]:=nil;       
      end;                           
    end;
    alist.Clear;
  finally
    alist.Free;
  end;
end;

Edit:

I add this line, alist.Objects[i]:=Pointer(0); and there is no error.

...

for i:=0 to pred(alist.Count) do begin
          if Assigned(alist.Objects[i]) then begin
            alist.Objects[i]:=Pointer(0);  //newly added line. 
            alist.Objects[i].Free;       
            alist.objects[i]:=nil;       
          end;                           
        end;
...

//But I do not know if this is correct and 
// if the efficiency will be compromised.
//This is awkward method?
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2  
The problem is in the code the populates the list. Anyway, I believe TStringList is not what you need. you need TObjectList with OwnsObjects set to true. Move the string into your object. –  David Heffernan Feb 5 '12 at 11:03
    
@DavidHeffernan Thanks a million. It is an alternative way to use TobjectList. Currently, Freeing objects in TStringlist is an impossible task? –  Warren Feb 5 '12 at 11:10
    
I agree with @DavidHeffernan. The code above isn't the problem. If you are getting Access Violation it is because you put something in the Object property of that StringList's Item that isn't nil (thus assigned is true) and doesn't point to a valid object instance. –  Marjan Venema Feb 5 '12 at 11:26
1  
freeing objects in stringlist works but is more hassle that getting object list to do it. –  David Heffernan Feb 5 '12 at 11:55
1  
@kobik I am not using New function. I'm just adding object like alist.addobject('john',pointer(a number like 1, or 5). –  Warren Feb 5 '12 at 12:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The original answer below answers the question you asked. However, it transpires in the comments that you are not adding objects to your string list. You are simply adding integers cast to Pointer. In that case you must not call Free on those integers and that would completely explain your error. So the entire code in your question is gratuitous and you should simply call Free on the list when you are done with it.

When you cast an integer to a pointer and add it to the list, there is no memory allocated beyond that used to store the pointer. That is because an integer is a value type. When you add a true pointer or an object then you are adding a reference type and disposal of that object involves calling Free for an object or FreeMem (or Dispose) for a pointer.

Original answer to the question as asked

Your original code is correct, albeit a little clunky. The problem you have is in the code that populates Objects[]. Since we cannot see that code we can't say what you have got wrong.

Now, having said your code was clunky, here's how I would write it:

procedure ClearList(List: TStringList);
var
  i: Integer;
begin
  for i := 0 to pred(List.Count) do
    List.Objects[i].Free;       
  List.Clear;
end;

Some notes on the above:

  • You do not need the if Assigned(obj) test before calling obj.Free. I explain why not here: Why should I not use "if Assigned()" before using or freeing things?
  • There's little point in setting the items to nil if you are about to call Clear.
  • You should not call List.Free in such a routine. Your list's life time should be managed separately from the code that clears the list. The call to List.Free should be made in the same scope as the call that constructs the list. Or, if this list is a field of a class, then the call to List.Free should be made from the destructor of the owning class.

Now, as I have already said in comments to this question and your previous question, all this lifetime management work with the Objects[] property of a Delphi 7 string list is very unsatisfactory. It's all too easy to leak objects. I would recommend the following alternatives:

  1. Switch to using TObjectList rather than TStringList. Set the OwnsObjects property to True when you create the list. This will ensure that when an item is deleted from the list, it will be destroyed at the point of removal. You simply hand to the list the responsibility for lifetime management of its items. Note that this will require you to move the string that you are storing in your current string list code to be a property of the object. But that is invariably the correct approach anyway so I see that as an upside rather than a drawback.
  2. If you do wish to keep using a string list, create your own derived class that handles ownership, probably by adding a property named OwnsObjects. Push this problem onto the list and let your higher level code be free from that concern. Debug the code once in the context of the list class and then re-use it over and over again safe and secure in the knowledge that it works.
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1  
Might want to rethink your TObjectList recommendation in light of his last couple of comments above... His Objects[] isn't full of objects. It's full if integers cast to pointers. –  Nick Barnes Feb 5 '12 at 13:47
    
@Nick Thanks I had not seen that. I was merely answering the question that was asked. –  David Heffernan Feb 5 '12 at 14:11
    
@DavidHeffernan Yes, your answer hits home. Thanks for so clear and detailed explanation. –  Warren Feb 5 '12 at 14:27

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