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I have a method with a HandlerThread. A value gets changed inside the Thread and I'd like to return it to the test() method. Is there a way to do this?

public void test()
{   
    Thread uiThread = new HandlerThread("UIHandler"){
        public synchronized void run(){
            int value; 
            value = 2; //To be returned to test()
        }
    };
    uiThread.start();
}
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2  
What language is this in? –  Tony The Lion Feb 5 '12 at 11:38
    
If the main thread must wait for the handler thread to finish before returning from the method, why use a handler thread in the first place? –  JB Nizet Feb 5 '12 at 11:43
    
@JBNizet I didnt include the complexity of what the Thread actually does. It's getting gps coordinates so yes I do need a Thread. –  Neeta Feb 5 '12 at 11:59
1  
Regardless of the complexity of the thread, if the thread that laustarts it immediately waits for its result after starting it, there is no point in starting a different thread: the starting thread will be blocked as if it did the work itself. –  JB Nizet Feb 5 '12 at 16:04
    
@JBNizet I'm not too sure what you mean.. would you mind explaining it in a different way? –  Neeta Feb 5 '12 at 19:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can use a local final variable. The variable needs to be of non-primitive type, so you can use an array. You also need to synchronize the two threads, for example using a CountDownLatch:

public void test()
{   
    final CountDownLatch latch = new CountDownLatch(1);
    final int[] value = new int[1];
    Thread uiThread = new HandlerThread("UIHandler"){
        @Override
        public synchronized void run(){
            value[0] = 2;
            latch.countDown(); // Release await() in the test thread.
        }
    };
    uiThread.start();
    latch.await(); // Wait for countDown() in the UI thread.
    // value[0] holds 2 at this point.
}

You can also use an Executor and a Callable like this:

public void test() throws InterruptedException, ExecutionException
{   
    ExecutorService executor = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();
    Callable<Integer> callable = new Callable<Integer>() {
        @Override
        public Integer call() {
            return 2;
        }
    };
    Future<Integer> future = executor.submit(callable);
    // future.get() returns 2
    executor.shutdown();
}
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Um... no. This code is not correct. Access to value is not correctly synchronized. –  G. Blake Meike Jun 14 at 14:39

Usually you would do it something like this

 public class Foo implements Runnable {
     private volatile int value;

     @Override
     public void run() {
        value = 2;
     }

     public int getValue() {
         return value;
     }
 }

Then you can create the thread and retrieve the value (given that the value has been set)

Foo foo = new Foo();
new Thread(foo).start();
// ... 
int value = foo.getValue();

tl;dr a thread cannot return a value (at least not without a callback mechanism). You should reference a thread like an ordinary class and ask for the value.

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1  
Does this really work? I get The method getValue() is undefined for the type Thread. –  pmichna Nov 26 '13 at 15:07
    
@pmichna, good spotting. Changing from t.getValue() to foo.getValue(). –  Johan Sjöberg Nov 26 '13 at 15:46
    
@JohanSjöberg:Tnx for your answer. but there is a little bug in it. you shoud call "new Thread(foo).start()"; –  mostafa88 May 29 at 8:37
    
@mostafa88, right ty! The bug was merely a disguised feature ;) –  Johan Sjöberg May 29 at 14:57
    
Yes! Well done! "volatile" ftw! Unlike the accepted answer, this one is correct! –  G. Blake Meike Jun 14 at 14:40

If this is Java, what you are looking for is probably the Callable interface in place of Runnable, and retrieving the value with a Future object, which also lets you wait until the value has been computed. You can achieve this with an ExecutorService, which you can get from Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor() i believe.

public void test() {
    int x;
    ExecutorService es = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();
    Future<Integer> result = es.submit(new Callable<Integer>() {
        public Integer call() throws Exception {
            // the other thread
            return 2;
        }
    });
    try {
        x = result.get();
    } catch (Exception e) {
        // failed
    }
}
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If you want the value from the calling method, then it should wait for the thread to finish, which makes using threads a bit pointless.

To directly answer you question, the value can be stored in any mutable object both the calling method and the thread both have a reference to. You could use the outer this, but that isn't going to be particularly useful other than for trivial examples.

A little note on the code in the question: Extending Thread is usually poor style. Indeed extending classes unnecessarily is a bad idea. I notice you run method is synchronised for some reason. Now as the object in this case is the Thread you may interfere with whatever Thread uses its lock for (in the reference implementation, something to do with join, IIRC).

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"then it should wait for the thread to finish, which makes using threads a bit pointless" great point! –  likejiujitsu Mar 4 '13 at 19:46

How about this solution?

It doesn't use the Thread class, but it IS concurrent, and in a way it does exactly what you request

ExecutorService pool = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(2); // creates a pool of threads for the Future to draw from

Future<Integer> value = pool.submit(new Callable<Integer>() {
    @Override
    public Integer call() {return 2;}
});

Now all you do is say value.get() whenever you need to grab your returned value, the thread is started the very second you give value a value so you don't ever have to say threadName.start() on it.

What a Future is, is a promise to the program, you promise the program that you'll get it the value it needs sometime in the near future

If you call .get() on it before it's done, the thread that's calling it will simply just wait until it's done

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