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Is it possible to initialize a variable from a return parameter (by ref)? Say I have something like:

Car c;    // <- don't want to create a new Car here!
if (findCar("beetle", c)) {
    ...
}

where if findCar succeeds, it returns true and fills c:

bool findCar(string name, Car& out) {
    ...
    // return true if found
    out = thecar;
    return true;
}

Now, my class Car doesn't have a 0-argument constructor, so the above code fails to compile. Is there a way to keep c uninitialized until the call to findCar?

Solutions I thought of are:

  • adding a cheap 0-argument constructor to Car
  • switch to pointers (which I'd rather avoid)
share|improve this question
    
why you'd want to avoid switching to pointers? It's the cleanest way to go. –  akappa Feb 5 '12 at 12:30

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Sort of. The problem is that a reference absolutely must refer to an actual object. So, if you return by reference then someone must create an object for that returned reference. Therefore if you can't find a matching object, it's not really meaningful to return a reference. If you pass a reference in, then you must create an object first, for the argument to refer to.

You could work around this for example as follows:

Car &findCar(const string &name) {
    ...
    // return if found, else throw
    if (found it) {
        return thecar; // assuming `thecar` means some already-existing object,
                       // if it's a local variable then return by value!
    } else  {
        throw std::runtime_error(name);
    }
}

Caller does:

Car c = findCar("beetle");

or Car &c = findCar("beetle"); if they want to "see" the actual object found rather than a copy of it. If findCar wants callers to only ever see a copy, not some internal object, then of course you can return by value rather than by reference - the difference is one & in the function signature.

And someone somewhere has to handle the exception.

If you'd prefer to avoid exceptions then the right thing to return from a find function is a pointer (or other iterator). It's what the standard containers and algorithms do when searching, and there are special values (end iterators, or you could use null pointers) that mean "not found".

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Whenever an object variable (which is not a pointer or reference) exists, it contains the whole data of the object, which means that it has to be always initialized, so yes, you will have to use one of your suggested solutions.

By the way, if you don't use a pointer or reference, you also can't store objects of derived classes in the variable, so i would suggest switching to pointers.

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Object are initialized as soon as you declare them as variable.

If you want late initialization you have to use pointer and:

Car *c;

bool findCar(string name, Car * &out){
  ...
  out = new Car();
}

don't forget to delete it

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No, this isn't possible. If the parameter signature takes a car reference, it must point to a car object. You have two solutions for only having the object created at the right, as late as possible time, use pointers like this:

car* find_car(string name) {

   ...
   return nullptr;
}

car* c = find_car(...);
if (c != nullptr) {
    ...
}

or to use exceptions, which probably isn't what you want

car find_car(string name) {
   ...
   throw new runtime_error("car not found");
}

Basically declaring it as a reference means you're guaranteeing the object has been constructed, so that requirement needs to give. I'd use pointers personally.

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You can return Car from your function:

struct Car
{
    Car():_isValid(false){}
    Car(const Car&);
    bool isValid();
};

Car findCar (const string& name);


Car car = findCar("beetle");
if (car.isValid()){
...
}

other variant is to throw excpetion, if findCar cannot find any car:

struct Car
{
    Car(const Car&);
};

Car findCar (const string& name) {
    ....
    if (noCarFound) throw CarNotFoundException();
    ....
}



try{
    Car car = findCar("beetle") {

}
catch (CarNotFoundException e) {
    ....
}

Or create Car constructor that accepts string

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I am not very experienced at C++ but also I know this is not the cleanest solution.

However here is an approach:

bool findCar(string name, Car **out) {
    // first make out to null
    *out = NULL;
    ...
    // if found
    if(found){
       *out = &thecar;
       return true;
    }

    // otherwise return false. Notice that out remains pointing null
    return false;
}

Now, anywhere in the code you should have:

Car *c;    // <- You don't create a new Car here!
if (findCar("beetle", &c)) {
    ...
}

Hope you find it helpful

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