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Trying to achieve the following struggled my mind:

Convert Unix cal output to latex table code, using a short and sweet one-liner (or few-liner).

E.g cal -h 02 2012 | $magicline should yield

Mo      &Tu     &We     &Th     &Fr     \\
        &       & 1     & 2     & 3     \\
 6      & 7     & 8     & 9     &10     \\
13      &14     &15     &16     &17     \\
20      &21     &22     &23     &24     \\
27      &28     &       &       &       \\

The only reasonable solution I could come up with so far was

cal -h | sed -r -e '1d; s/^(..)?(...)?(...)?(...)?(...)?(...)?(...)?$/\2\t\&\3\t\&\4\t\&\5\t\&\6\t\\\\/'

... and I really tried hard. The nice thing about it being that it's uncomplicated and easy to understand, the bad thing about it that it's "unflexible" (It couldn't cope with a week of 8 days) and a little verbose. I'm looking for alternative solutions to learn from ;-)

EDIT: Found another one that seems acceptable

cal -h | tail -n +2 |
    perl -ne 'chomp;
        $,="\t&";
        $\="\t\\\\\n";
        $line=$_;
        print map {substr($line,$_*3,3)} (1..5)'

EDIT: Nice one:

cal -h | perl \
    -F'(.{1,3})' -ane \
        'BEGIN{$,="\t&";$\="\t\\\\\n"}
            next if $.==1;
            print @F[3,5,7,9,11]'
share|improve this question
2  
Code golf has its own SE forum. – tripleee Feb 5 '12 at 14:38
1  
Which version of cal on which platform accepts the -h option? – Jonathan Leffler Feb 5 '12 at 16:28
    
@Jonathan: the Ubuntu version of cal appears to be the only one. – Borodin Feb 5 '12 at 17:09
    
@Jonathan Leffler: Should perhaps remove -h. On Debian, the current day is highlighted, and I believe I once run into the situation where the highlight ANSI codes were not stripped when stdout was a pipe. -h is only for removing those bytes. – Jo So Feb 5 '12 at 20:12
    
The title of this question is utterly useless for knowing what it's actually about. – Charles Duffy Aug 2 '12 at 20:15
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using the GNU version of awk:

My output of cal using an english LANG.

Command:

LANG=en_US cal

Output:

    February 2012   
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
          1  2  3  4
 5  6  7  8  9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29

The awk one-line:

LANG=en_US cal | awk '
BEGIN { 
  FIELDWIDTHS = "3 3 3 3 3 3 3"; 
  OFS = "&";
} 
FNR == 1 || $0 ~ /^\s*$/ { next } 
{ 
  for (i=2; i<=6; i++) { 
    printf "%-3s%2s", $i, i < 6 ? OFS : "\\\\";
  } 
  printf "\n";
}'

Result:

Mo  &Tu  &We  &Th  &Fr \\
    &    & 1  & 2  & 3 \\
 6  & 7  & 8  & 9  &10 \\
13  &14  &15  &16  &17 \\
20  &21  &22  &23  &24 \\
27  &28  &29  &    &   \\
share|improve this answer
1  
good approach, thanks for the FIELDWIDTHS bit. How about cal | awk 'BEGIN{FIELDWIDTHS="3 3 3 3 3 3 3"; OFS="\t&"; ORS="\t\\\\\n";} FNR!=1{print $2,$3,$4,$5,$6;}' ? – Jo So Feb 5 '12 at 18:40

Tested on OS-X:

cal 02 2012 |grep . |tail +2 |perl -F'/(.{3})/' -ane \
    'chomp(@F=grep $_,@F); $m=$#F if !$m; printf "%s"."\t&%s"x$m."\t\\\\\n", @F;'

Where cal output has 3-character columns; {3} could be changed to match your cal output.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I don't understand a word, time to learn new perl magic ;-) – Jo So Feb 5 '12 at 16:41
    
I think cal -h | perl -F'(.{1,3})' -ane 'BEGIN{$,="\t&";$\="\t\\\\\n"}next if $.==1; print @F[3,5,7,9,11]' is very exact and "solid". Updated question. – Jo So Feb 5 '12 at 20:09
cal 02 2012|perl -lnE'$.==1||eof||do{$,="\t&";$\="\t\\\\\n";$l=$_;print map{substr($l,$_*3,3)}(1..5)}'

my new favorite:

cal 02 2012|perl -F'(.{1,3})' -anE'BEGIN{$,="\t&";$\="\t\\\\\n"}$.==1||eof||do{$i//=@F;print@F[map{$_*2-1}(1..$i/2)]}'
share|improve this answer
    
This is THE answer (although only a shorter version of mine ;-]) – Jo So Feb 5 '12 at 18:33
    
Yes it's a modification of your version. – sid_com Feb 5 '12 at 18:44

This might work for you:

cal | sed '1d;2{h;s/./ /g;x};/^\s*$/b;G;s/\n/ /;s/^...\(.\{15\}\).*/\1/;s/.../ &\t\&/g;s/\&$/\\\\/' 
share|improve this answer
    
why the down vote? i see nothing wrong with this. – John Riselvato Feb 16 '12 at 4:25
1  
@JohnRiselvato thanks. – potong Feb 16 '12 at 4:50

This works for my implementation of cal, which uses four-character columns and has an initial title line showing the month and year

cal | perl -pe "next if $.==1;s/..../$&&/g;s/&$/\\\\/"

It looks as though yours may have eight-character columns and has no title line, in which case

cal | perl -pe "s/.{8}/$&&/g;s/&$/\\\\/"

should do the trick, but be prepared to tweak it.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, not creating an empty cell for days that are already in the next month... Though expanding any line at first might fix it. Thanks for the -p switch. – Jo So Feb 5 '12 at 16:51
cal -h 02 2012| cut -c4-17 | sed -r 's/(..)\s/\0\t\&/g' | sed 's/$/\t\\\\/' | head -n-1 | tail -n +2

This will produce:

Mo     &Tu     &We     &Th     &Fr    \\
       &       & 1     & 2     & 3    \\
 6     & 7     & 8     & 9     &10    \\
13     &14     &15     &16     &17    \\
20     &21     &22     &23     &24    \\
27     &28     &29     &       &      \\

You can easily replace \t with number of spaces you wish

share|improve this answer
    
No, it does not (it creates no cells after 29)... – Jo So Feb 5 '12 at 19:16
    
@JoSo, well, it does if you use 4 spaces instead of \t as I did pasting output here. – Juicy Scripter Feb 6 '12 at 4:17

Following awk 1 liner should work:

cal 02 2012 | awk 'NR>1 && NF>0 {
  if (NR==2)
      col=NF;
   j=1;
   if (NR==3 && NF<col) {
      if (NF<col)
         printf(" & ");
      for(j=2; j<=col-NF; j++)
         printf("   &");
   }
   for (i=j; i<=col; i++) {
      if (j==1 && i==j)
         printf("%2s ", $(i-j+1));
      else
         printf(" %3s", "&" $(i-j+1));
   }
   printf(" \\\\\n");
}'

OUTPUT:

Su  &Mo &Tu &We &Th &Fr &Sa \\
 &    &   &  &1  &2  &3  &4 \\
 5   &6  &7  &8  &9 &10 &11 \\
12  &13 &14 &15 &16 &17 &18 \\
19  &20 &21 &22 &23 &24 &25 \\
26  &27 &28 &29   &   &   & \\
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, it does not. Feb 1, 2012 is a Wednesday, not a Sunday! – Jo So Feb 5 '12 at 14:07
    
Pls check the edited answer now. – anubhava Feb 5 '12 at 17:28

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