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I have a problem with understanding of some basic OOP concepts. I'll try to describe it with an example. Let's say I have an application which should draw figures of different shapes.

I create a Figure class and add a field Shape (which is kind of enumeration and can be Shape.Circle or Shape.Square).

public class Figure {
    public Shape shape;

    public void draw() {
        if( shape == Shape.Square )
            // draw a square
        else if( shape == Shape.Circle )
            // draw a circle
    }
}

When I need to add more shapes to my application I have to add more ifs to draw() method. I think it's bad.

I can make Figure class abstract (or make it an interface), inherit figures of concrete shape from this class and override draw() method.

public abstract Figure { void draw(); }

public class Circle extends Figure {
    @Override public void draw() {
        // draw a circle
    }
}

// same for Square

When I need new shape I just add new class.

Next I decide I want to have a color for my figures: Black or White. Black square and white square should be drawn differently. The problem looks the same. I can add color field to Figure class and deal with ifs in each draw method or create classes like BlackCircle, BlackSquare, WhiteCircle, WhiteSquare.

Later if I decide to add another property for Figure (let's say Size which can be Small, Medium or Large) I have to create 2 * 2 * 3 classes like BigBlackCircle, SmallWhiteSquare and so on. And I can't change figure's color or shape in runtime. I think it's not the right way.

Trying to understand the problem I found out that I can still have single class for all figures. Then I store color, shape, size as fields and add kind of DisplayManager class responsible for drawing. I can have different implementations of DisplayManager for different drawing algorithms.

public class Figure {
    public Shape shape;
    public Color color;
    public Size size;
    public DisplayManager display;

    public void draw() {
        display.draw(this);
    }
}

public class DisplayManager {
    public void draw( Figure figure ) {
        // drawing based on figure's shape, color and size
    }
}

But this way I come back to the problem from step 1: I have to deal with a lot of ifs in draw() method. Could anyone explain the correct way here? How should I design the classes to save flexibility of my application?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Instead of declaring DisplayManager.draw(Figure), declare Figure.draw(DisplayManager). Implement for DisplayManager some methods so it could be used from Figure [drawPoint(), drawLine(),....]

And for each extension of Figure, implement its own draw(DisplayManager) which uses the specific instance of given DisplayManager

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Thanks. I found almost the same solution in GoF's dessign patterns. –  Soteric Feb 8 '12 at 8:57

What amit said, and you can handle the different ways of drawing a black or white squares in the draw() method of the Square class, using if-statements or other properties of the class.

For instance, you could have the color property, and another enum property that enumerates the different ways to draw the Square, and handle it in the draw() method.

As an example, with the size thing thrown in to display a concept:

public abstract class Figure {
    public enum Size {
        SMALL(10), MEDIUM(20), LARGE(30);

        private int actualSize;

        private Size(int actualSize) {
            this.actualSize = actualSize;
        }

        public int getActualSize() {
            return actualSize;
        }
    }

    public int x,y;

    public Size size = Size.MEDIUM;

    public Color color = Color.BLACK;

    public abstract void draw(DisplayManager displayManager);
}

public class Square extends Figure {
    public enum Corners {
        SHARP, ROUNDED
    }

    public Corners corners = Corners.SHARP;

    @Override
    public void draw(DisplayManager displayManager) {
        int s = size.getActualSize();
        displayManager.setColor(color);

        switch (corners) {
        case SHARP:
            displayManager.drawBox(x-s, y-s, x+s, y+s);
            break;
        case ROUNDED:
            displayManager.drawRoundedBox(x-s, y-s, x+s, y+s);
            break;
        }
    }
}

(Properties made public to save space, use private with getters/setters where applicable, and the properties need to be set, of course :) )

Here, enums are working in two ways - one actually holds usable data for drawing, the other just acts as a discriminator.

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