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I am trying to find out the addresses of Derived class and Base Class Object's and I find them same . Actually , I am confused how to get address of both ?

#include<stdio.h>
class Base {
    public:
        Base ()
        {
            printf ("\n Base :: %p\n", this);
        }
        ~Base () { 
            printf ("\n Base::~Base\n");
        }
};

class Der:public Base {
    public:
        Der () {
            printf ("\n Der: %p \n", this);
        }
        ~Der () {
            printf ("\n Der:: ~Der\n");
        }
};

int main(void) {
    Base b;
    Der d;
    return 0;
}
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COde Snippet ,I'll attach .. –  PeerPandit Feb 5 '12 at 14:44
    
What do you mean? A derived class is a composite of it and it's parents; there aren't different base addresses for the derived and its own base, if that is what you're asking. –  Joe Feb 5 '12 at 14:46
1  
#include<stdio.h> class Base { public: Base () { printf ("\n Base :: %p\n", this); } ~Base () { printf ("\n Base::~Base\n"); } }; class Der:public Base { public: Der () { printf ("\n Der: %p \n", this); } ~Der () { printf ("\n Der:: ~Der\n"); } }; int main (void) { // Base b; Der d; return 0; –  PeerPandit Feb 5 '12 at 14:47
    
@PeerPandit: please don't post code in comments. Use the edit button and post it in your question. –  larsmans Feb 5 '12 at 14:48
    
Please edit your question, and paste the code there, so it can format. –  Joe Feb 5 '12 at 14:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A child object contains a parent object in the way that a house contains a door. If you asked for the coordinates of a house, and I gave you the coordinates of the door, I'd be correct, yes? Especially for the example you give, in which there are no data members and no virtual methods: the child and parent objects not only have the same address, but they have the same size.

Now, if you use multiple inheritance -- if Child derives from both Parent1 and Parent2 -- and give both parent classes data members so they have non-zero size, and then run a similar diagnostic, you'll definitely find that at most one of the parent objects has the same address as the child.

Finally, note that different compilers will give different answers for all questions like this: the object layout is compiler dependent.

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2  
Holy Mother of god!!, +1 for such a nice example :) –  Mr.Anubis Feb 5 '12 at 14:54
    
As with all things technical, there's no substitute for a straight-up, honest, technical explanation. A metaphor only goes so far. In this case, it's not clear whether you're describing a class-to-member or a base-to-derived relationship in your metaphor, which are different things. Also, "parent"/"child" is a very poor metaphor for "base"/"derived" -- the latter is (in the public case) an "is-a" relationship, and a child usually "isn't" a parent (unless you're in Glasgow). –  Kerrek SB Feb 5 '12 at 15:26
    
The vast swaths of existing usage be damned, eh? –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Feb 5 '12 at 15:54

Suppose you have a base class with two data members; it will be laid out in memory like this:

member1 <-- object pointer points here
member2

If a derived class adds a couple more members it will be laid out like this:

member1 <-- object pointer points here
member2
member3
member4

So if you cast an object of the derived type to the base type the pointer doesn't actually change. It's still pointing to the same place in memory.

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