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I'd like to hide a std::tuple in my class 'Record' and provide an operator[] on it to access elements of the tuple. The naive code that does not compile is this:

#include <tuple>

template <typename... Fields>
class Record {
  private:
    std::tuple<Fields...> list;

  public:
    Record() {}

    auto operator[](std::size_t n)
            -> decltype(std::get<1u>(list)) {
        return std::get<n>(list);
    }
};

int main() {
    Record<int, double> r;
    r[0];
    return 0;
}

g++ 4.6 says:

x.cc:13:32: error: no matching function for call to ‘get(std::tuple<int, double>&)’
x.cc:13:32: note: candidates are:
/usr/include/c++/4.6/utility:133:5: note: template<unsigned int _Int, class _Tp1, class _Tp2> typename std::tuple_element<_Int, std::pair<_Tp1, _Tp2> >::type& std::get(std::pair<_Tp1, _Tp2>&)
/usr/include/c++/4.6/utility:138:5: note: template<unsigned int _Int, class _Tp1, class _Tp2> const typename std::tuple_element<_Int, std::pair<_Tp1, _Tp2> >::type& std::get(const std::pair<_Tp1, _Tp2>&)
/usr/include/c++/4.6/tuple:531:5: note: template<unsigned int __i, class ... _Elements> typename std::__add_ref<typename std::tuple_element<__i, std::tuple<_Elements ...> >::type>::type std::get(std::tuple<_Elements ...>&)
/usr/include/c++/4.6/tuple:538:5: note: template<unsigned int __i, class ... _Elements> typename std::__add_c_ref<typename std::tuple_element<__i, std::tuple<_Elements ...> >::type>::type std::get(const std::tuple<_Elements ...>&)

Basically I'd like to call Record::operator[] just like on an array. is this possible?

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6 Answers 6

If you're fine with a compile-time constant and still want to have the nice operator[] syntax, this is an interesting workaround:

#include <tuple>

template<unsigned I>
struct static_index{
  static unsigned const value = I;
};

template <typename... Fields>
class Record {
  private:
    typedef std::tuple<Fields...> tuple_t;
    tuple_t list;

  public:
    Record() {}

    template<unsigned I>
    auto operator[](static_index<I>)
        -> typename std::tuple_element<
               I, tuple_t>::type&
    {
        return std::get<I>(list);
    }
};

namespace idx{
const static_index<0> _0 = {};
const static_index<1> _1 = {};
const static_index<2> _2 = {};
const static_index<3> _3 = {};
const static_index<4> _4 = {};
}

int main() {
    Record<int, double> r;
    r[idx::_0];
    return 0;
}

Live example on Ideone. Though I'd personally just advise to do this:

// member template
template<unsigned I>
auto get()
    -> typename std::tuple_element<
           I, tuple_t>::type&
{
    return std::get<I>(list);
}

// free function
template<unsigned I, class... Fields>
auto get(Record<Fields...>& r)
  -> decltype(r.template get<I>())
{
  return r.template get<I>();
}

Live example on Ideone.

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The argument to get is a compile time constant. You cannot use a runtime variable for this and you cannot have a single function that returns the tuple members as your return type is going to be wrong. What you can do is to abuse non-type argument deduction:

#include <tuple>

template<typename... Args>
struct Foo {
  std::tuple<Args...> t;

  template<typename T, std::size_t i>
  auto operator[](T (&)[i]) -> decltype(std::get<i>(t)) {
    return std::get<i>(t);
  }
  // also a const version
};

int main()
{
  Foo<int, double> f;
  int b[1];
  f[b];
  return 0;
}

This is so horrible, that I would never use it and it won't make much sense to users. I would just forward get through a template member.

I'll try to explain why I think why this is really evil: The return type of a function depends only on compile time facts (this changes slightly for virtual member functions). Let's just assume that non-type argument deduction were possible for some cases (the function call arguments are constexpr) or that we could build something that hides it reasonably well, your users wouldn't realize that their return type just changed and implicit conversion would do nasty things to them. Making this explicit safes some of the trouble.

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@Lol4t0 The last is a good point. Why would you want to change a template argument MyT::get<i> into MyT::get(size_t i) ? Would your users really expect [i] to have different types depending on i? –  Johan Lundberg Feb 5 '12 at 15:23
    
@JohanLundberg Sorry, I don't understand. Was this directed at me? –  pmr Feb 5 '12 at 15:26
    
Ah, no I agree with you. 'you' in my last post was mean to be OP. –  Johan Lundberg Feb 5 '12 at 16:27

I think Xeo had code which did this.

Here is my attempt which somewhat works. The problem is that [] is not a reference.

template<typename T, std::size_t N = std::tuple_size<T>::value - 1>
struct foo {
  static inline auto bar(std::size_t n, const T& list)
          -> decltype(((n != N) ? foo<T, N-1>::bar(n, list) : std::get<N>(list))) {
      return ((n != N) ? foo<T, N-1>::bar(n, list) : std::get<N>(list));
  }
};

template<typename T>
struct foo<T, 0> {
  static inline auto bar(std::size_t n, const T& list)
          -> decltype(std::get<0>(list)) {
      return std::get<0>(list);
  }
};

template <typename... Fields>
class Record {
  private:
    std::tuple<Fields...> list;

  public:
    Record() {
      std::get<0>(list) = 5;
    }

    inline auto operator[](std::size_t n) 
            -> decltype(foo<decltype(list)>::bar(n, list)) {
            return foo<decltype(list)>::bar(n, list);
    }
};

int main() {
    Record<int, double> r;
    std::cout << r[0];
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Really nice. I tried modifying your code to use std::ref() around get and the return types decltype() & but I did not manage so far. –  Johan Lundberg Feb 5 '12 at 17:40
    
@JohanLundberg Yeah, when Xeo comes online he should have the correct code. At least I think it's Xeo who has it. –  Pubby Feb 5 '12 at 17:56
    
Wow, does this code even work? You can't have runtime values be used at compile time. –  Xeo Feb 5 '12 at 18:46

No.

It is not possible to use a parameter bound at runtime (such as a function parameter) to act as template parameter, because such need be bound at compile-time.

But let's imagine for a second that it was:

Record<Apple, Orange> fruitBasket;

Then we would have:

  • decltype(fruitBasket[0]) equals Apple
  • decltype(fruitBasket[1]) equals Orange

is there not something here that bothers you ?

In C++, a function signature is defined by the types of its arguments (and optionally the values of its template parameters). The return type is not considered and does not participate (for better or worse) in the overload resolution.

Therefore, the function you are attempting to build simply does not make sense.

Now, you have two alternatives:

  • require that all arguments inherit or be convertible to a common type, and return that type (which allows you to propose a non-template function)
  • embrace templates and require your users to provide specifically the index of the type they wish to use

I do not (and cannot) which alternative is preferable in your particular situation, this is a design choice you will have to make.

Finally, I will remark that you may be reasoning at a too low level. Will your users really need to access each field independently ? If they don't, you could provide facilities to apply functions (visitors ?) to each element in turn, for example.

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The error message seems to be misleading, as the problem with your code is pretty much clear:

 auto operator[](std::size_t n)
            -> decltype(std::get<1u>(list)) {
        return std::get<n>(list);
    }

The template argument n to std::get must be a constant expression, but in your code above n is not a constant expression.

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As n is a template parameter, it should be known in compile time, but you want to pass it as a parameter in run-time.

Also, gcc 4.5.2 isn't happy due to this fact:

g++ 1.cpp -std=c++0x
1.cpp: In member function 'decltype (get<1u>(((Record<Fields>*)0)->Record<Fields>::list)) Record<Fields>::operator[](size_t)':
1.cpp:14:25: error: 'n' cannot appear in a constant-expression
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