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I have an sqlConnection manager class like so:

public class SQLConn {
  public string connStr = System.Configuration.ConfigurationSettings.AppSettings["ConnectionString"];

  private SqlConnection sqlConn;

  public SqlConnection Connection()
  {
      sqlConn = new SqlConnection(connStr);

      return sqlConn;
  }

  public void Open()
  {
        sqlConn .Open();
  }
}

If I use a function with the 'using' statement like:

var conn = new SQLConn();

using (conn.Connection()) 
{ 
    String query = "Select * from table";
    objSql = new SqlCommand(query, conn.Connection());      

    conn.Open(); 
    DoSomething(); 
}

Does the using statement dispose of the connection automatically since conn.Connection() returns a SqlConnection object? Or, do I have to implement IDisposable and a custom Dispose method on the SqlConn class?

Is this even a good way at all? I'm working with legacy code and I'm not able to use an ORM yet but is there a way to simplify this existing pattern to manage/create SQL connections?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The using statement will look at the final type of the expression - i.e. whatever is returned from .Connection(); if this returns something that is IDisposable, then you're OK.

The compiler will tell you if you get it wrong ;-p (it won't let you use using on something that isn't IDisposable).

You should probably watch out for where you are creating two connections:

using (var c = conn.Connection()) // <==edit
{ 
    String query = "Select * from table";
    objSql = new SqlCommand(query, c); // <==edit

    c.Open(); 
    DoSomething(); 
}

and possibly:

public SqlConnection Connection()
{
  if(sqlConn == null) sqlConn = new SqlConnection(connStr); // <== edit
  return sqlConn;
}
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It will work but after the using {} you will be left with a sqlConn that internally holds a Disposed SlConnection. Not a really useful situation

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Your code is wrong!

shoudl be something like this:

Dim conn as New SQLConn();
Dim sqlConnection New SQLConnection();

sqlConnection = conn.Connection();

using (sqlConnection) 
{ 
    String query = "Select * from table";
    objSql = new SqlCommand(query, sqlConnection);      

    conn.Open(); 
    DoSomething(); 
}

That way the using statement will dispose the connection at the end.

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1  
Why do you create two SqlConnections? At least one will not be disposed –  Ruben May 27 '09 at 10:44
    
+1 The problem is not with writing using (conn.Connection()), but by the fact that the Connection() method creates a new object every time it is being called, and in the original post, the connection which is under the "using" is not a different instance than the connection actually being used inside the block. –  Noam Gal May 27 '09 at 10:45
    
You probably don't need the "New SQLConnection", then –  Marc Gravell May 27 '09 at 10:47
    
Yes we don't need new SqlConnection - sorry for that (I use C# only and don't understand VB at all) @Noam Gal - My point was that the provided code is useless, because the SQLConn class doesn't return a single SqlConnection instance. So in the code provided in the question we have one connection (which is disposed by the using statement) and another which is used by the code and is not disposed at the end... –  Pavel Nikolov May 27 '09 at 14:10

to answer your headline question, you must implement IDisposable in the class whose object you're using with "using". Otherwise, you'll get a compile-time error.

Then, yes, "using" will dispose your SqlConnection at the end of the block. Think of "using" as a "try-finally": there is an implicit call to Dispose() in the "finally" block.

Finally, cleaner code would be:

using( SqlConnection = new SqlConnection( connStr ) {
    // do something
}

At least readers of your code won't have to make the mental effort to realize as Hank Holterman pointed out that your SQLConn object holds a reference to a disposed connection.

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To clarify what is being said above:

Any object you need to use with using should be disposed at the end of the using statement. The compiler thus need to make sure that your type implements the IDisposable interface when it sees using on that type object or it won't let you go.

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No you do not, as long as the returned object is IDisposable.

The returned object needs not to implement IDisposable, but then the using block would serve no purpose.

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The final type of the expression does need to implement IDisposable: Error 1 'Bar': type used in a using statement must be implicitly convertible to 'System.IDisposable –  Marc Gravell May 27 '09 at 10:38
    
Hmmm, interesting, is that changed behaviour from previous versions of the compiler, or have I just miss understood it all along? –  leppie May 27 '09 at 12:00
1  
I'm not aware of a change (but I haven't looked at the 1.2 spec lately). Are you perhaps thinking of foreach? where the enumerator might be disposable (and if so, is disposed), but doesn't have to be? Or perhaps the fact that the returned value is allowed to be null? –  Marc Gravell May 27 '09 at 12:08
1  
In fact, I doubt it changed - since that would clearly be a breaking change that stopped some existing code from compiling; the C# team try very hard to avoid that... –  Marc Gravell May 27 '09 at 12:09
    
You know I am probably thinking of foreach :) Damned reflector hiding all the details makes you forget! –  leppie May 27 '09 at 12:37

From MSDN:

The object provided to the using statement must implement the IDisposable interface.

You do not have to call Dispose() though, the using statement implicitly does this for you.

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It seems the connection will be closed properly, but this is not recommended:

You can instantiate the resource object and then pass the variable to the using statement, but this is not a best practice. In this case, the object remains in scope after control leaves the using block even though it will probably no longer have access to its unmanaged resources. In other words, it will no longer be fully initialized. If you try to use the object outside the using block, you risk causing an exception to be thrown. For this reason, it is generally better to instantiate the object in the using statement and limit its scope to the using block.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/yh598w02.aspx

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