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I've developed an Java servlet that can proxy HTTP requests from a browser. I am having an issue proxying HTTPS requests.
The servlet doesn't appear to receive any HTTPS requests from the browser.
Upon investigating this further I noticed that HTTP requests seem to start with a simple GET request whereas the HTTPS requests start with a CONNECT request as shown by the log extract below:

"CONNECT ajax.googleapis.com:443 HTTP/1.1" 200

My question is, is it possible to handle this request using my servlet?

public class MyProxyServlet extends HttpServlet {
    @Override
    public void init(final ServletConfig config) throws ServletException {
        super.init(config);
    }

    @Override
    protected void doGet(final HttpServletRequest request,
            final HttpServletResponse response) throws ServletException,
            IOException {
    }

    @Override
    protected void doPost(final HttpServletRequest request,
            final HttpServletResponse response) throws ServletException,
            IOException {
    }
}

If so where and how?

share|improve this question
    
You want to proxy HTTPS requests pointing to a different domain? – home Feb 5 '12 at 16:25
    
@home Yes the requests being proxied are to arbitrary domains – user63904 Feb 5 '12 at 16:50
1  
I'm not an expert on this topic but I guess you need to implement a 'real' TCP/IP based proxy. You can't just proxy an HTTPS request on HTTP level - it would bypass the whole SSL trust chain... – home Feb 5 '12 at 17:26
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since the CONNECT verb is not handled by the default HttpServlet implementation, you will have to override the Service method of the javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet in your servlet and handle the CONNECT method yourself. The original implementation seems to ignore this with this resp.sendError(HttpServletResponse.SC_NOT_IMPLEMENTED, errMsg);. Take a look at the HttpServlet source code http://www.docjar.com/html/api/javax/servlet/http/HttpServlet.java.html

share|improve this answer

Normally, the HTTPS handshake and exchange is handled by the servlet container with the browser. For a servlet, it doesn't need to know what the mode is. You have to define the proper connector in the server's configuration to listen to HTTPS and nothing extra needs to be done on the web application or servlet side. The request will come the same to the servlet whether it is accessed by http:// or https://. Only that the server needs to be configured to accept https://

share|improve this answer
    
I think you might want to read this: java.sun.com/developer/onlineTraining/Servlets/Fundamentals/… – user63904 Feb 5 '12 at 18:10
    
Did you check whether your server is listening on the HTTPS connector ? The default HTTPS port is 443 and in tomcat or other servlet containers it is usually 8443. I am open to learning :) – prajeesh kumar Feb 6 '12 at 5:42
    
Browsers don't generally talk to proxy servers using HTTPS. They talk using HTTP. If the browser is connecting to the internet via a proxy server and the user attempts to navigate to a secure website the browser issues a "CONNECT" command to the proxy server over HTTP. Take a look at the link above - you'll see that CONNECT is actually supported by HTTP but there doesn't seem to a doConnect handler in the javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet class. I've concluded that the servlet API simply does not support this command. Thanks – user63904 Feb 6 '12 at 15:15
1  
Then why dont you override the Service method of the javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet in your servlet and handle the CONNECT method yourself ? The original implementation seems to ignore this with this resp.sendError(HttpServletResponse.SC_NOT_IMPLEMENTED, errMsg);. Take a look at the HttpServlet code http://www.docjar.com/html/api/javax/servlet/http/HttpServlet.java.html – prajeesh kumar Feb 6 '12 at 17:14
    
That's a good suggestion - thanks will try that. You might want to add your comment as an answer and I'll accept it. – user63904 Feb 6 '12 at 23:24

protected by tchrist Sep 6 '12 at 13:47

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