Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a method that attempts to create an AudioRecord. Different phones support different sample rates, channel configs and audio formats. So the method tries to create an AudioRecord for each of them and return the first that works.

private AudioRecord getAudioRecord() {
    for (int rate: sampleRates) {
        for (int audioFormat: audioFormats) {
            for (int channelConfig: channelConfigs) {
                String description = rate + "Hz, bits: " + audioFormat
                        + ", channel: " + channelConfig;

                Log.d(TAG, "Trying: " + description);

                int bufferSize = AudioRecord.getMinBufferSize(rate, channelConfig, audioFormat);
                if (bufferSize == AudioRecord.ERROR
                        || bufferSize == AudioRecord.ERROR_BAD_VALUE) {
                    Log.d(TAG, "Failed: This rate/channel config/format is not supported");
                    continue;
                }

                AudioRecord recorder = new AudioRecord(AudioSource.MIC, rate, channelConfig, audioFormat, bufferSize);
                if (recorder.getState() == AudioRecord.STATE_UNINITIALIZED) {
                    Log.d(TAG, "Failed: Recorder is uninitialized");
                    continue;
                }

                Log.d(TAG, "Success: " + description);
                return recorder;
            }
        }
    }

    Log.e(TAG, "Failed all rates. Does the device have a microphone?");
    return null;
}

The problem is return recorder never happens!

Here is my logcat output:

Logcat output

On the highlighted line (8000 / 3 / 12) there is no error, but also no success.

If I use no continue as said in the comments below, it still doesn't return!

private AudioRecord getAudioRecord() {
    for (int rate: sampleRates) {
        for (int audioFormat: audioFormats) {
            for (int channelConfig: channelConfigs) {
                String description = rate + "Hz, bits: " + audioFormat
                        + ", channel: " + channelConfig;

                Log.d(TAG, "Trying (2): " + description);

                int bufferSize = AudioRecord.getMinBufferSize(rate, channelConfig, audioFormat);
                if (bufferSize != AudioRecord.ERROR && bufferSize != AudioRecord.ERROR_BAD_VALUE) {
                    AudioRecord recorder = new AudioRecord(AudioSource.MIC, rate, channelConfig, audioFormat, bufferSize);
                    if (recorder.getState() == AudioRecord.STATE_INITIALIZED) {
                        Log.d(TAG, "Success: " + description);
                        return recorder;
                    } else {
                        Log.d(TAG, "Failed: Recorder is uninitialized");
                    }
                } else {
                    Log.d(TAG, "Failed: This rate/channel config/format is not supported");
                }
            }
        }
    }

    Log.e(TAG, "Failed all rates. Does the device have a microphone?");
    return null;
}
share|improve this question
1  
The same pattern (a logged attempt without a following success or failure) happens 3 other times in the log as well. It almost feels like a try/catch block is eating an exception (or issuing a silent continue statement). Is the code sample you've provided exactly what generated the log? –  Sean Reilly Feb 5 '12 at 18:09
    
This is indeed strange. Have you tried testing for the inverse conditions and nesting your if blocks, and thus not using continue? –  JB Nizet Feb 5 '12 at 18:10
    
Like @SeanReilly mentions, it really seems like this is not the code that is generating the log output. Two Trying messages in a row do now seem possible unless there is a break; or continue; that is missing from your code listing. Have you tried cleaning and rebuilding your application to make sure the classes are up to date? Habe you tried using the debugger and stepping through the code? –  Gray Feb 5 '12 at 18:18
    
The only other code run before this is: new RealTimeAudioRecorder().start(); and final AudioRecord audioRecord = getAudioRecord();. There is no try-catch. @Sean Reilly Yes, exactly. –  Amy B Feb 5 '12 at 18:31
    
@JB Nizet - I just did that (code in the question) and it still doesn't work! –  Amy B Feb 5 '12 at 18:38

2 Answers 2

There's no problem with the return statement, you simply never reach it because your AudioRecord never initializes (Most examples out there don't check it, even though they probably should)

As a brief sanity check you may want to check your Manifest file to verify you have the proper permissions to record audio in the first place, given that access to the microphone is a hardware feature that may/may not exist.

share|improve this answer

Wrap your function in a try/catch block and you will probably find that something is causing an exception to be thrown.

share|improve this answer
1  
If an exception was thrown, it would go up to the call stack until its caught. The iteration would stop immediately. –  JB Nizet Feb 5 '12 at 18:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.