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I am writing a CRUD using winforms, connecting to MS SqlServer 2008 via Linq2Sql.
When the user of my application wants to delete a record in the database I dont't want it physically deleted. I just want to set a column called "DlDat" to the current datetime and then update the record instead of deleting it. To force this behaviour in Linq I extend the Delete(table) method autogenerated by sqlmetal.
If e.g. I have a database table called "Unit" and a datacontext called "PdpDataContext" the code looks like this:

public partial class PdpDataContext
{
    public PdpDataContext() : base()
    {
        OnCreated();
    }
    partial void DeleteUnit(Unit instance)
    {
        instance.DLDAT = DateTime.Now;
        this.ExecuteDynamicUpdate(instance);
    }
    partial void UpdateUnit(Unit instance)
    {
        instance.CHDAT = DateTime.Now;
        this.ExecuteDynamicUpdate(instance);
    }
}

But when I do the delete:

PdpDataContext cx = new PdpDataContext();
cx.ObjectTrackingEnabled = true;
Unit u = new Unit();
u = cx.Unit.Single(x => x.INTUNITNO == 1);
cx.Unit.DeleteOnSubmit(u);
cx.SubmitChanges();

I get an SqlException "wrong syntax near WHERE". Logging the SQL output of the context I see that Linq tries to do an "empty" update:

UPDATE [dbo].[Unit]
SET 
WHERE ([INTUNITNO] = @p0) AND ([version] = @p1)

This may be because I use ExecuteDynamicUpdate when the ChangeSet of the context contains only a "delete" and no "update".
I could work around this by just updating the record instead of deleting it when the user presses the delete button or pherhaps by using a stored procedure. But since I am new to the world of Linq I wonder if there is another way by using the datacontext.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem with doing it that way is, linq assumes that you are going to use the same CRUD operation that you are overriding. Take a look at this article (Responsibilities of the Developer In Overriding Default Behavior (LINQ to SQL))

This is what I would do:

partial void DeleteUnit(Unit instance)    
{        
   //instance.DLDAT = DateTime.Now;        
   //this.ExecuteDynamicUpdate(instance);

   PdpDataContext cx = new PdpDataContext();
   cx.ObjectTrackingEnabled = true;
   Unit u = new Unit();
   u = cx.Unit.Single(x => x.INTUNITNO == 1);
   u.DLDAT = DateTime.Now;
   cx.SubmitChanges();
}
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Thanks, that worked fine. –  Stephan Keller Aug 28 '09 at 10:21

I wonder if it wouldn't be better to use an "INSTEAD OF" trigger (delete) on the table... or just don't lie to LINQ: if you want to do an UPDATE (not a DELETE), then update the object (don't delete it). For example, write a method on the data-context that simulates delete, rather than using DeleteOnSubmit.

You may also be able to do something with overriding SubmitChanges and investigating the deltas, but I'm not sure it is a good idea

share|improve this answer
    
No, no, I am not lying to LINQ, just ..interpreting: in my domain model the "update" is a "delete". I came across the described problem when I used one of the database tables as a datasource for a plain datagridview, deleted a row in the grid and called the SubmitChanges-Method of the context. I want to make sure that any object can use the datacontext and do the "right thing" when deleting. –  Stephan Keller May 27 '09 at 14:25

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