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I'd like to hide parent methods in some manner so that a child class's __call magic method is invoked for methods defined on the parent. For example:

class C {
  function foo() { echo "foo\n"; }
}

class D extends C {
  function __call( $method, $args ) { echo "called $name\n"; }
}

$d = new D();
$d->foo();

// desired result: called foo
// actual result: foo

I've checked into rename_function and override_function but those don't work for methods. ReflectionMethod has a setAccessible method I tried, but that seems to only work if you use the ReflectionMethod instance to invoke the method.

Background: attempting to have an RPC Proxy class that can take advantage of PHP's type checking. So, if I have an RPCFoo I can use type hinting or instanceof to enforce type in such a way that I can check that ($RPCFoo instance Foo).

Edit: the base class should be able to be used as is, without the proxy. This is so that proxying can be part of the system configuration, not the code. Think multiple servers all with the same code base, but the ability to assign certain tasks to each. If the local server does not handle the service requested, the class loader would return a proxy instead of the base class. If the local server does handle the service requested, it would return the base class.

Edit Again: the methods presented are workable, but hide the designed interface of the base class from IDEs and reflection. I was attempting to make the proxy implementation clean so that one simply had to inherit from the base class and implement a proxy interface. In order to maintain the base class interface, the proxy developer would have to re-implement all the public and protected methods to make a remote call. Then when something is updated in the base class, the proxy would have to be updated as well. In the end, I think I'm simply going to go the route of writing a proxy generator that uses reflection do this for the developer.

Thanks for the replies!

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2 Answers

You have to set access to foo method to private :

class C {
    private function foo() {
        echo "foo\n";
    }
    public function __call($method, $args) {
        if(is_callable(array($this,$method))) {
            return call_user_func_array(array($this,$method), $args);
        } else {
            trigger_error("Call to undefined method '{$method}'");
        }
    }
}
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Then the base class can't be used without the proxy. –  rich remer Feb 5 '12 at 19:15
    
It can be, but you have to add magic __call method in the parent class and invoke called methods from there. See my edited answer –  dev-null-dweller Feb 5 '12 at 19:42
1  
trigger_error... in 2012 year... Use exceptions ;) –  meze Feb 5 '12 at 19:59
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class C {

    public function __call($method, $args) {
        return call_user_func_array(array(__CLASS__ ,$method), $args);
    }

    protected function foo() { echo "foo<br />"; }
}

class D extends C {
    function __call( $method, $args ) { echo "called $method<br/>"; }
}

$d = new D();
$d->foo();

$c = new C();
$c->foo();
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looks like I was beaten to it –  Paul Campbell Feb 5 '12 at 19:49
    
Protected methods will be inherited and called normally, moreover using __CLASS__ or self in call_user_func_array will call this method statically –  dev-null-dweller Feb 5 '12 at 20:12
    
Yes it would call the method statically - I'd originally though that having the methods static would be a requirement but it isn't and changing __CLASS__ to $this doesn't affect the result. I would generally prefer protected over private unless there's good reason. I think the distinction here is that the public method is called in preference which is why either private or protected should work. –  Paul Campbell Feb 5 '12 at 20:31
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