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Heres my code im trying to get tidied up for school, in the embedded if and else if statements it show errors when I try to compile.

errors : expect primary-expression before "else" expected ';' before else

both of these come up for each line.

// This is a program to Calculate the volume of the sphere using the radius (a03.cpp)
// Written by: Jimmy Scott
// Date: 2/1/12
// Sources: Stackoverflow.com (else and if statements)


#include <iomanip>
#include <iostream>              
#include <string>

using namespace std;                

int main ()

{
    char vehicle;   
    float total;
    char over20;
    char old;
    int adults;
    int oldpass;
    char height;
    int youngpass;
    int bicycles;
    float length;

    cout<<"Fare Calculator by Jimmy Scott";
    cout<<"\n\n\n Are You Bringing a vehicle on The Ferry ?";
    cin>>vehicle;
     if (vehicle == 'y')
     {
                 cout<<"\n\n"<<"Is the Driver over 65 Years of age or disabled?";
                 cin>>old;
                 cout<<"\n\n"<<"Passengers going along with the driver"<<"\n\n";
                 cout<<"Adults (19-64 Years old):";
                 cin>>adults;
                 cout<<"\n\n"<<"Senior Citizens or disabled:";
                 cin>>oldpass;
                 cout<<"\n\n"<<"Young passengers 5-18 years old: ";
                 cin>>youngpass;
                 cout<<"\n\n"<<"Is your Vehicle over 7ft, 6in in height? ";
                 cin>>height;
                 cout<<"Vehicle length in feet: ";
                 cin>>length;
                 if (old == 'y')

                    {
                         total= 44.60;
                    }


                 else if (old == 'n');
                      {
                         total= 51.20;       
                      } 
                 else if (length < 20) and (height == 'y');
                      {
                            total= 102.4;
                      }
                 else if (length > 20) and (length < 30);
                      {
                        total= 76.80;
                      }
                 else if (length > 20) and (length < 30) and (height = 'y');
                      {
                        total= 153.60;
                      }
                 else if (length > 30) and (length < 40);
                      {
                      total= 204.80;
                      }
              } 







     else 
     {
          cout<<"\n\n"<<"How many Senior Citizens or disabled are in your group?";
          cin>>oldpass;
          cout<<"\n\n"<<"How many adults are in your group?:";
          cin>>adults;
          cout<<"\n\n"<<"How many in your group are youths (5-18):";
          cin>>youngpass;
          cout<<"\n\n"<<"How many in your group have Bicycles:";
          cin>>bicycles;

          total=oldpass * 6.55;
          total= total + (adults * 13.15);
          total= total + (youngpass * 10.55);
          total= total + (bicycles * 4.00);

     }         

     cout<<"\n\n"<<"your total fare cost is : $"<<total;
     cout<<"\n\n\n"<<"Press <Enter> to Exit";
     cin.ignore();
     cin.get();      
     return 0;                         

}                
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2 Answers 2

Several things:

When you do a conditional, don't follow the test directly with a semicolon, as this stops the conditional statement and will do something different from what you want. Furthermore, since it terminates the if-else group, you will generate an error on the next 'else' statement.

You also need to enclose your conditional tests with parenthesis.

Here is an example of a correct else if statement:

else if ((length > 30) and (length < 40))
{
   total= 204.80;
}

Update: I initially said to use && instead of 'and'. As honk says 'and' is a valid operator in c++ that does the same thing as &&. I prefer to use && for portability with c though.

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3  
and, or and not are perfectly fine keywords which do what they say. I'd argue they are superior to &&, || or ! (both since they are harder to get wrong and for readability). –  Benjamin Bannier Feb 5 '12 at 18:51
    
Sorry, I somehow thought that this was c and not c++, but it obviously is c++. I'll update my answer. –  Michael Chinen Feb 5 '12 at 18:56
    
Thanks for the fix, +1ed. I don't get your portability point though, if you want to write C, don't write C++ (templates and STL don't port nicely either, and then, there's not much left). –  Benjamin Bannier Feb 5 '12 at 19:07
    
Since && has the same meaning in c and c++ I use it in both and don't have to think about the difference. As for portability, sometimes I need to take some c code and use it in c++. Admittedly the converse doesn't happen as much, but i'm not hurt by using &&. –  Michael Chinen Feb 5 '12 at 21:54

eliminate all the ';' after the if else() statements. Also add '( )' if you make many conditions.

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