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Here is the simplest distilled version of my problem. The complexity that remains is for good reasons even if not self evident here. Additionally the script is internal and has no chance of executing malicious code, so the eval is perfectly fine; don't need to hear about how evil it is... ;) Assume for the moment that the pipes and colons in the key string are required delimiters.

key="target|platform|repo:revision"
hashname="hashmap"
declare -A $hashname

eval $hashname[$key]=0
echo $(eval $hashname[$key])

Of course the last two lines have problems because the eval is acting on the pipes and colons inside of the $key variable. My question is how can I protect a string like this from the eval? And I need the eval because I am referring to the hashmap's name rather than it itself. Thanks in advance.

==================================================================================

Ok I am actually beginning to think that my problem is not with the pipes and colon and the eval. So Let me paste the real code

function print_hashmap()
{
    local hashname=$1
    for key in `eval echo \$\{\!$hashname[@]\}`; do
        local deref="$hashname[$key]"
        local value=${!deref}
        echo "key=${key} value=${value}"
    done
}
function create_permutations2()
{
    local hashname=$1   ; shift
    local builds=$1     ; shift
    local items=$1      ; shift
    local separators=$@

    echo "create_permutations(hashname=${hashname}, builds=${builds}, items=${items}, separators=${separators})"

    if [ NULL != "${builds}" ]; then
        for build in `echo $builds | tr ',' ' '`; do
            local target="${build%%:*}"
            local platforms="${build##*:}"
            for platform in `echo $platforms | tr '|' ' '`; do
                local key=
                local ref=
                if [ NULL != "${items}" ]; then
                    if [ NULL == "${separators}" ]; then separators=' '; fi
                    for separator in $separators; do
                        items=`echo $items | tr $separator ' '`
                    done
                    for item in $items; do
                        key="${target}|${platform}|${item}"
                        ref="$hashname[$key]"
                        declare "$ref"=0
                    done
                else
                    key="${target}|${platform}"
                    ref="$hashname[$key]"
                    declare "$ref"=0
                fi
            done
        done
    fi

    echo "created the following permutations:"
    print_hashmap $hashname
}
builds="k:r|s|w,l:r|s|w"
repos="c:master,m:master"
hashname="hashmap"
declare -A $hashname

create_permutations2 $hashname $builds $repos ","
print_hashmap $hashname

I recently modified my code to conform with FatalError's suggestions to use ref instead of eval and the error is the same: syntax error in expression (error token near :master)

share|improve this question
    
have you tried escaping the pipe characters? eg: \| instead of | –  Gigi Feb 5 '12 at 19:03
    
Yes; that did not work –  Scott Idler Feb 5 '12 at 19:21
    
What are you trying to do? That isn't how you access array members –  Kevin Feb 5 '12 at 19:29
    
@Kevin this isn't an array. It is a hash. –  Scott Idler Feb 5 '12 at 19:40
    
@ScottIdler And you index them like arrays. I just tested and you need the {} –  Kevin Feb 5 '12 at 20:03

3 Answers 3

Maybe doubles quotes around $key?

eval $hashname["$key"]=0
echo $(eval $hashname["$key"]=0)
share|improve this answer

Try:

eval $hashname'[$key]'=0
eval result=$hashname'[$key]'

This passes the $ to eval rather than expanding the parameter first.

share|improve this answer

I won't lecture about the evilness of eval, however in this case it at least adds a little extra complexity. The easiest way I can think of, since it's evaluating the string result, would be to add some literal single quotes:

eval $hashname["'"$key"'"]=0

That would guard against everything except for single quotes in $key. However, you can accomplish the same thing with probably fewer headaches. Here's my updated script to illustrate:

key="target|platform|repo:revision"
hashname="hashmap"
declare -A $hashname

echo "With eval:"
eval $hashname["'"$key"'"]=0
eval echo \${$hashname["'"$key"'"]}
echo

echo "Without eval:"
ref="$hashname[$key]"
echo ${!ref}
declare "$ref"="1"
echo ${!ref}

Note I changed your original eval line because it didn't make sense to me -- it was trying to execute the result rather than print it. In the latter part you can use indirection to access the value and then declare to assign to it. Then you don't have to worry about these chars being interpreted.

This produces the result:

With eval:
0

Without eval:
0
1

I'm not 100% sure why that doesn't work, but this seems to:

builds="k:r|s|w,l:r|s|w"
repos="c:master,m:master"
hashname="hashmap"
declare -A $hashname

function print_hashmap()
{
    local hashname=$1
    for key in `eval echo \$\{\!$hashname[@]\}`; do
        local deref="$hashname[$key]"
        local value=${!deref}
        echo "key=${key} value=${value}"
    done
}
function create_permutations2()
{
    local hashname=$1   ; shift
    local builds=$1     ; shift
    local items=$1      ; shift
    local separators=$@

    echo "create_permutations(hashname=${hashname}, builds=${builds}, items=${items}, separators=${separators})"

    if [ NULL != "${builds}" ]; then
        for build in `echo $builds | tr ',' ' '`; do
            local target="${build%%:*}"
            local platforms="${build##*:}"
            for platform in `echo $platforms | tr '|' ' '`; do
                local key=
                if [ NULL != "${items}" ]; then
                    if [ NULL == "${separators}" ]; then separators=' '; fi
                    for separator in $separators; do
                        items=`echo $items | tr $separator ' '`
                    done
                    for item in $items; do
                        key="${target}|${platform}|${item}"
                        ref="$hashname[$key]"
                        eval $hashname[\'$key\']=0
                    done
                else
                    key="${target}|${platform}"
                    eval $hashname[\'$key\']=0
                fi
            done
        done
    fi

    echo "created the following permutations:"
    print_hashmap $hashname
}

create_permutations2 $hashname $builds $repos ","
print_hashmap $hashname
share|improve this answer
    
I don't mind using a solution without eval as you have demonstrated here. I will try to see if I can get it to work with my real world problem. However, can you explain your second to last line: declare "$ref"="1"? Why the quotes and why the declare? And are quotes required around the 1? –  Scott Idler Feb 5 '12 at 19:58
    
I modified my original post to include the production code and an example usage that causes the behavior. I implemented your suggestion and get the same error. –  Scott Idler Feb 5 '12 at 20:18
    
Quotes around the 1 don't do anything -- just a habit of mine. Quotes around $ref don't matter here, but would if, for instance, your key contained a space. –  FatalError Feb 5 '12 at 20:18
1  
Ok and the declare? I added my full example with your suggested modifications and I am still getting the error. –  Scott Idler Feb 5 '12 at 20:25

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