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I recently read that in newer computers Java's I/O performs better than NIO because of the new availability of multi-core machines.

I ran a quick test comparing the transfer time of I/O and NIO over the LAN using the localhost loopback address.

Note: This is using JDK 7

The results (3 trials):

I/O transfers averaged 21789.3ms

NIO transfers averaged 22771.0ms

It is also worth noting that CPU usage appeared to be around 10% higher on each NIO transfer as compared to the I/O.

My question for you is if my comparison code is fair? Did I write good/equal I/O and NIO code? If not, how can I improve and re-run this test?

    public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println("Initiating test sequence...");
    new Thread(new Client()).start();
    try {
        System.out.println("Server I/O initiating...");
        ServerSocket server = new ServerSocket(5555);
        Socket sock = server.accept();
        System.out.println("Server connected to client successfully");
        InputStream is = sock.getInputStream();
        File output = new File("C:/test_root/video.avi");
        FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream(output);
        byte[] data = new byte[1024];
        int len=0;
        System.out.println("Server initiating transfer - Timer starting");
        long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        while((len=is.read(data))>0) {
            fos.write(data, 0, len);
            fos.flush();
        }
        fos.close();
        is.close();
        sock.close();
        server.close();
        long end = System.currentTimeMillis();
        System.out.println("Network I/O transfer time = "+(end-start)+"ms");

        System.out.println("Server NIO initiating...");
        ServerSocketChannel serverChan = ServerSocketChannel.open();
        serverChan.bind(new InetSocketAddress(5555));
        SocketChannel chan = serverChan.accept();
        chan.configureBlocking(false);
        System.out.println("Server channel connected");
        FileChannel fc = (FileChannel) Files.newByteChannel(Paths.get("C:/test_root/video.avi"), StandardOpenOption.CREATE, StandardOpenOption.WRITE);
        ByteBuffer buff = ByteBuffer.allocate(1024);
        System.out.println("Server initiating transfer - Timer starting");
        start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        while(chan.read(buff)>=0 || buff.position() > 0) {
            buff.flip();
            fc.write(buff);
            buff.compact();
        }
        chan.close();
        fc.close();
        serverChan.close();
        end = System.currentTimeMillis();
        System.out.println("Network NIO transfer time = "+(end-start)+"ms");
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    System.out.println("Test completed!");
}

static class Client implements Runnable {

    public void run() {
        try {
            System.out.println("Client I/O initiating...");
            Socket sock = new Socket("localhost", 5555);
            System.out.println("Client connected to server successfully!");
            OutputStream os = sock.getOutputStream();
            File input = new File(System.getProperty("user.home")+"/Documents/clip0025.avi");
            FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(input);
            byte[] data = new byte[1024];
            int len=0;
            int tot=0;
            int perc=0;
            while((len=fis.read(data))>0) {
                os.write(data, 0, len);
                os.flush();
                tot+=len;
                int prev = perc;
                perc = getPercentage(tot, input.length());
                if(perc !=prev && (perc == 10 || perc == 25 || perc == 50 || perc == 75 || perc == 98))
                    System.out.println("Client reporting: "+perc+"% read");
            }
            os.close();
            fis.close();
            sock.close();

            try {
                Thread.sleep(2000);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            System.out.println("Client NIO initiating...");
            SocketChannel sc = SocketChannel.open();
            boolean connected = sc.connect(new InetSocketAddress("localhost",5555));
            if(!connected)
                connected = sc.finishConnect();
            if(!connected)
                throw(new IOException("Client failed to connect"));
            System.out.println("Client channel connected");
            sc.configureBlocking(false);
            FileChannel fc = (FileChannel) Files.newByteChannel(input.toPath(), StandardOpenOption.READ);
            ByteBuffer buff = ByteBuffer.allocate(1024);
            len=0;
            tot=0;
            while((len=fc.read(buff))>=0||buff.position()>0) {
                buff.flip();
                sc.write(buff);
                buff.compact();
                tot+=len;
                int prev = perc;
                perc = getPercentage(tot, input.length());
                if(perc !=prev && (perc == 10 || perc == 25 || perc == 50 || perc == 75 || perc == 98))
                    System.out.println("Client reporting: "+perc+"% read");
            }
            sc.close();
            fc.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

Additional Info:

Windows Vista (SP2) on Dell Studio XPS 435MT

1st gen i7 quad-core processor 2.67GHz

6GB RAM

64-bit architecture

share|improve this question
1  
I am not convinced that the benchmarking part of this is fair -- in Java, you really do need to do things like warm up the JVM and all. You might be able to use a benchmarking tool like code.google.com/p/caliper . –  Louis Wasserman Feb 5 '12 at 19:27
    
@LouisWasserman How would you suggest warming up the JVM and/or improving this code? –  bgroenks Feb 5 '12 at 19:32
1  
Use a benchmarking framework built by people who know what they're doing wrt the JVM, essentially. Don't write your own "timing an operation" code. There are many more ways to get it wrong than there are to get it right. –  Louis Wasserman Feb 5 '12 at 19:34
4  
How many simultaneous connections are you handling? Java NIO was mainly designed to avoid the "one thread per client" approach. One would think that a real NIO benchmark would involve lots of clients pounding on the same server instance. –  André Caron Feb 5 '12 at 19:35
3  
The whole point of NIO is addressing the scalability problems with traditional IO, when attempting 5k plus clients. This benchmark is totally meaningless. –  Perception Feb 5 '12 at 19:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Suggestions

  • Try comparing blocking IO with blocking NIO. Your code will be shorter. If you are going to test IO, use IO on the client and server. If you are going to use NIO, use the same on both ends.
  • Use direct ByteBuffers.
  • Don't read/write to files as they are not part of the benchmark and can be much slower. Just pass around blank blocks of data.
  • Try different block sizes, e.g. 8 KB.
  • Consider the type of data you want to exchange. e.g. ByteBuffer may make reading int and long more efficient.
  • Report numbers in terms of bandwidth. I would expect to see between 1-3 GB/sec over loop back.

http://vanillajava.blogspot.com/2010/07/java-nio-is-faster-than-java-io-for.html

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the tips. –  bgroenks Feb 5 '12 at 20:51
    
You might find the link interesting. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 5 '12 at 21:37
    
What does he mean by threading model? –  bgroenks Feb 6 '12 at 3:09
    
Would you suggest using two separate JVMs to test I/O vs NIO and warming them up respectively? –  bgroenks Feb 6 '12 at 3:19
    
To separate "main" classes, run at different times with the same amount of warm up. i.e. What would be realistic for your application. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 6 '12 at 8:54

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