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I'm (trying) to write some (working) C++ in an ObjC project :-) The C++ library (Box2D) provides me with a b2Fixture class which has a "user data" property for coders to store whathever is relevant to them.

In my case, it simply has to store an integer. From my main program in ObjC, one is to cast the integer to void*:

headFixture->SetUserData( (void*) 10 );

In a utility method on the C++ side of the program, I would like to compare the user data to a given integer (i.e. they're constants, 10 = solid ground, 11 = platform, etc.).

First comparison uses (void*) which refuses to compile. Found on SO a different approach, like illustrated by the second comparison which uses *( (intptr_t *) ... ). That one compiles, but it sends EXC_BAD_ACCESS:

bool AbstractContactListener::contactContainsType(JRContact contact, int type){

    if (( type == ( (void *) contact.fixtureA->GetUserData() )) ||
        ( type == *( (intptr_t *) contact.fixtureB->GetUserData() ))
        ) {
        return true;
    }

    return false;
}

I'm running out of ideas to approach this issue. Please help :-) Thanks! J.

EDIT/SOLUTION:

bool AbstractContactListener::contactContainsType(JRContact contact, int type){

    if (( type == (intptr_t) contact.fixtureA->GetUserData() ) ||
        ( type == (intptr_t) contact.fixtureB->GetUserData() )
        ) {
        return true;
    };

    return false;
}

This one worked for me!

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If you're dereferencing an invalid pointer in *contact.fixtureB->GetUserData() then of course it's going to crash –  Seth Carnegie Feb 5 '12 at 20:34
1  
I'm confused as to why you need to cast using (void *). You're storing a something like a number, aren't you. Or is SetUserData storing a pointer to a number? If you could post a little bit about what SetUserData is doing that would help. –  octopusgrabbus Feb 5 '12 at 20:37
2  
@octopus: SetUserData is a library function that takes a void*. That's a common way to allow for user-provided data. Usually you store a pointer to your data and then you static_cast to T* when it's given to you in a callback or something. However, as long as int isn't bigger than void*, just casting it to void* and then back can save you the hassle of allocating memory for what is a constant. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 5 '12 at 20:38
    
@octopusgrabbus I had to because "SetUserData( 10 )" won't compile due to "Semantic Issue: Cannot initialize a parameter of type 'void *' with an rvalue of type 'int' –  Jem Feb 5 '12 at 20:48
    
Thanks. Got it. –  octopusgrabbus Feb 5 '12 at 20:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As far as I can see, you just need to cast it back; you need to use an integer type that's guaranteed to be the same size as a pointer to cast via or the compiler may error out;

#include <stdint.h>

if(type == (intptr_t)(contact.fixtureA->GetUserData())) {

There is one caveat though, as far as I know, the cast int to void* and back is not guaranteed by the C standard to give back the same value. A safer option may be to just use pointers as they are ment to be used;

int *value = malloc(sizeof(int));
*value = 10;
headFixture->SetUserData( value );

and

if(type == *(int*)(contact.fixtureA->GetUserData())) {

which shouldn't tempt any compiler to break your code.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, the compiler doesn't seem to like that :( "Semantic Issue: Cast from pointer to smaller type 'int' loses information" nb I'm using xcode, it has Apple LLVM Compiler 3 Thanks :) –  Jem Feb 5 '12 at 20:44
1  
@jeM680000 Updated answer. –  Joachim Isaksson Feb 5 '12 at 20:55
    
See edit question for the solution that worked for me... Thanks for your time! –  Jem Feb 5 '12 at 20:56
    
Hey interesting idea to malloc an int-sized item. Nice! –  Jem Feb 5 '12 at 21:02
    
Thanks for the update ;) –  Jem Feb 5 '12 at 21:03

I don't understand exactly what you're trying to do, but you should probably be casting the data back into the type you want it to be:

if (( type == reinterpret_cast<int>(contact.fixtureA->GetUserData() )) ||
    ( type == reinterpret_cast<int>(contact.fixtureB->GetUserData() ))
    ) {
share|improve this answer
    
Actually the compiler won't let me use == contact.fixtureA->GetUserData() like it can't compare a pointer to an int (using Apple LLVM Compiler 3 - maybe is this the cause?).. that's the reason ;-) Hmm using your suggestion I get "Cast from pointer to smaller type 'int' loses information" which prevents compiling :( –  Jem Feb 5 '12 at 20:43
    
@jeM680000 Read Fernandes' comment. Have the void* be a pointer to a struct that holds an int. –  Pubby Feb 5 '12 at 20:45
    
Hey, that wasn't successful. But casting to (intptr_t) without using "*" did work! Thanks for your time :) –  Jem Feb 5 '12 at 20:55
    
int is probably a 32 bit value and your pointer is 64-bit. (If I understand this - GetUserData() returns a pointer - but you are just using it as a number). If that's the case cast the void * to a uint64_t and the int to a uint64_t then just do a compare. NOTE: this could fail on system which need alignment such as some ARM processors. –  EdH Feb 5 '12 at 20:58

You want to use reinterpret_cast<int>. If you're getting an error, then you're not doing exactly what you say you're doing. (Likely you're trying to dereference the void * as an int *.)

int stored_type = reinterpret_cast<int>(contact.fixtureA->GetUserData());
share|improve this answer
    
See edit question for the solution that worked for me... Thanks for your time! –  Jem Feb 5 '12 at 20:56

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