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Let's say I have two Classes like so:

Car
{
   NSInteger wheels;
   NSInteger bumpers;
}

+ (Car *)carWithData:(NSDictionary *)carData;


Lexus : Car
{
   GPS *navigation;
}

+ (Lexus *)carWithData:(NSDictionary *)carData;

carWithData: is a simple helper method that creates an instance of Car populated with variables from carData. Lexus' version would also set the navigation data.

How would Lexus' carWithData look like without duplicating code from Car?

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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is accomplished by calling super's implementation of init… in the init method:

//Car.m:
- (id)initWithData:(NSDictionary *)carData {
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        //setup generic car properties:
        self.wheels = [carData objectForKey:@"wheels"]; //example
        self.bumpers = [carData objectForKey:@"bumpers"]; //example
    }
    return self;
}

+ (id)carWithData:(NSDictionary *)carData {
    return [[[self alloc] initWithData:carData] autorelease];
}


//Lexus.m:
- (id)initWithData:(NSDictionary *)carData {
    //this call to super is where the car's generic properties get initialized:
    self = [super initWithWithData:carData];
    if (self) {
        //setup lexus car properties:
        self.navigation = [carData objectForKey:@"navigation"]; //example
    }
    return self;
}

//there is no need to override super's [carWithData:] method as it's only a wrapper anyway.

Also note that both the initWith… and carWith… methods return id, not Car or Lexus. The way your code is set up you end up with casting problems, where [Lexus carWithData:dataDict] does return an object of class Lexus, but the compiler doesn't know about it, as it expects a Car.

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Ah, I didn't know you can actually do [self alloc] inside a Class method. I think this answer might be the cleanest. –  pixelfreak Feb 5 '12 at 21:06
    
@pixelfreak: Sure you can. Unlike C++, or the like, there are no limits in Objective-C regarding class method calls. –  Regexident Feb 5 '12 at 21:08
1  
@pixelfreak: In Objective-C self refers to the instance object when in instance methods and to the class object when in class methods. (Remember that in Objective-C classes are actually objects themselves.) –  Regexident Feb 5 '12 at 21:15
    
Gotcha, thanks! –  pixelfreak Feb 5 '12 at 21:17
    
@pixelfreak: You're welcome! Now go and kill all those redundant init code blocks. With fire. :P –  Regexident Feb 5 '12 at 21:20
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You would not define the methods with different signatures like:

+ (Car *)carWithData:(NSDictionary *)carData;
+ (Lexus *)carWithData:(NSDictionary *)carData;

you should instead use

+ (id)carWithData:(NSDictionary *)carData;

The implementation of the subclass would then look like

- (id)initWithData:(NSDictionary *)carData;
{
    self = [super initWithData:carData];
    if (self) {
         _navigation = [carData valueForKey:@"navigation"];
    }
    return self;
}

+ (id)carWithData:(NSDictionary *)carData;
{
    return [[[self alloc] initWithCarData:carData] autorelease];
}
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If Lexus is a subclass of Car, you can redefine the declaration of the header to look like what you want. –  Richard J. Ross III Feb 5 '12 at 21:04
    
Yes you can (I thought it would at least cause a warning, but it doesn't seem to) but that sounds like bad form as you have repeated code that changes only ever so slightly. –  Paul.s Feb 5 '12 at 22:02
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Here would be my solution:

// interface
-(id) initWithCarData:(NSDictionary *) carData;
+(Car *) carWithCarData:(NSDictionary *) carData;

// car implementation
-(id) initWithCarData:(NSDictionary *) carData
{
    if (self = [super init])
    {
          // initialize car data
    }

    return self;
}

+(Car *) carWithCarData:(NSDictionary *) carData
{
    // note that 'self' here is the current class, 
    // there is no need to overwrite this method in the subclass
    return [[self alloc] initWithCarData:carData];
}

// lexus implementation
-(id) initWithCarData:(NSDictionary *) carData
{
     // initialize the variables that the superclass recognizes
     if (self = [super initWithCarData:carData])
     {
         // initialize the lexus data
     }

     return self;
}

So, when you call [Lexus carWithCarData:myData] it ends up calling the Lexus's init method, not the Car's.

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You should never specify class return type in initWith…:/fooWith…: (such as Car *), but always return id instead. –  Regexident Feb 5 '12 at 21:11
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