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I'd like to get the SubLime Linter plugin (https://github.com/Kronuz/SublimeLinter) to recognize Ruby 1.9 syntax. Has anybody been able to get this to work in SublimeText 2?

Here is my current default settings file:

/*
    SublimeLinter default settings
*/
{
    /*
        Sets the mode in which SublimeLinter runs:

        true - Linting occurs in the background as you type (the default).
        false - Linting only occurs when you initiate it.
        "load-save" - Linting occurs only when a file is loaded and saved.
    */
    "sublimelinter": true,

    /*
        Maps linters to executables for non-built in linters. If the executable
        is not in the default system path, or on posix systems in /usr/local/bin
        or ~/bin, then you must specify the full path to the executable.
        Linter names should be lowercase.

        This is the effective default map; your mappings may override these.

        "sublimelinter_executable_map":
        {
            "perl": "perl",
            "php": "php",
            "ruby": "ruby"
        },
    */
    "sublimelinter_executable_map":
    {
    },

    /*
        Maps syntax names to linters. This allows variations on a syntax
        (for example "Python (Django)") to be linted. The key is
        the base filename of the .tmLanguage syntax files, and the value
        is the linter name (lowercase) the syntax maps to.
    */
    "sublimelinter_syntax_map":
    {
        "Python Django": "python"
    },

    // An array of linter names to disable. Names should be lowercase.
    "sublimelinter_disable":
    [
    ],

    /*
        The minimum delay in seconds (fractional seconds are okay) before
        a linter is run when the "sublimelinter" setting is true. This allows
        you to have background linting active, but defer the actual linting
        until you are idle. When this value is greater than the built in linting delay,
        errors are erased when the file is modified, since the assumption is
        you don't want to see errors while you type.
    */
    "sublimelinter_delay": 0,

    // If true, lines with errors or warnings will be filled in with the outline color.
    "sublimelinter_fill_outlines": false,

    // If true, lines with errors or warnings will have a gutter mark.
    "sublimelinter_gutter_marks": false,

    // If true, the find next/previous error commands will wrap.
    "sublimelinter_wrap_find": true,

    // If true, when the file is saved any errors will appear in a popup list
    "sublimelinter_popup_errors_on_save": false,

    // jshint: options for linting JavaScript. See http://jshint.com/#docs for more info.
    // By deault, eval is allowed.
    "jshint_options":
    {
        "evil": true,
        "regexdash": true,
        "browser": true,
        "wsh": true,
        "trailing": true,
        "sub": true,
        "strict": false
    },

    // A list of pep8 error numbers to ignore. By default "line too long" errors are ignored.
    // The list of error codes is in this file: https://github.com/jcrocholl/pep8/blob/master/pep8.py.
    // Search for "Ennn:", where nnn is a 3-digit number.
    "pep8_ignore":
    [
        "E501"
    ],

    /*
        If you use SublimeLinter for pyflakes checks, you can ignore some of the "undefined name xxx"
        errors (comes in handy if you work with post-processors, globals/builtins available only at runtime, etc.).
        You can control what names will be ignored with the user setting "pyflakes_ignore".

        Example:

        "pyflakes_ignore":
            [
                "some_custom_builtin_o_mine",
                "A_GLOBAL_CONSTANT"
            ],
    */
    "pyflakes_ignore":
    [
    ],

    /*
        Ordinarily pyflakes will issue a warning when 'from foo import *' is used,
        but it is ignored since the warning is not that helpful. If you want to see this warning,
        set this option to false.
    */
    "pyflakes_ignore_import_*": true,

    // Objective-J: if true, non-ascii characters are flagged as an error.
    "sublimelinter_objj_check_ascii": false
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 39 down vote accepted

I was able to get it to work using the absolute path to my ruby 1.9 executable. I’m using rbenv, so to get the path I ran rbenv which ruby, you might need to put in /usr/local/bin/ruby or /usr/local/bin/ruby19.

This is how my sublimelinter default setting looks like (you can put this into a project-specific file too if you prefer:)

Preferences -> Package Settings -> SublimeLinter -> Settings - User

"sublimelinter_executable_map":
{
    "ruby": "~/.rbenv/versions/1.9.3-p0/bin/ruby"
},
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4  
I tried this an linting goes away entirely. My path is a little different: ~/.rvm/rubies/ruby-1.9.3-p0/bin/ruby –  Tim Scott Apr 25 '12 at 16:39
1  
Okay, this works for me /users/tscott/.rvm/rubies/ruby-1.9.3-p0/bin/ruby –  Tim Scott Apr 25 '12 at 22:39
1  
Why cant we just use the .rbenv/shims for the ruby binary? –  wprater Jul 27 '12 at 11:19
7  
Instead of providing the full path to your ruby, you could also use "ruby": "~/.rbenv/shims/ruby". –  vrinek Jan 18 '13 at 10:54
1  
I had to use the full path, not only the tilt character. –  allaire Apr 18 '13 at 17:03

when using rvm you should be able to use rvm-auto-ruby for it.

there was an issue with this, but i think it's solved right now: https://github.com/SublimeLinter/SublimeLinter/issues/30

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this works perfectly for me. I just added the following to the user settings for the package: { "sublimelinter_executable_map": { "ruby" : "rvm-auto-ruby" } } –  Sean Cameron May 10 '13 at 10:25

All, just wanted to chime in because I was having this issue, too and the following works on ST2 v 2.0.1 on Ubuntu in the User/SublimeLinter.sublime-settings file which is found at

Preferences -> Package Settings -> SublimeLinter -> Settings - User

{
  "sublimelinter_executable_map": {
    "ruby": "~/.rvm/bin/rvm-auto-ruby"
  }
}

After adding, restart ST2, go to the console and check that it has updated by running the following:

view.settings().get("sublimelinter_executable_map")

You should get the following output:

{'ruby': u'~/.rvm/bin/rvm-auto-ruby'}
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1  
worked for me in OS X w/ RVM –  Paul Apr 19 '13 at 3:40
    
excellent, thanks, worked like a charm in OS X 10.6 Sublime 2 with RVM –  FireDragon Apr 19 '13 at 18:42

I was also able to get this to work by adding the PATH and point ruby to the rbenv shim to the sublimelinter_executable_map (I think this is recommended way from the official documentation too.) This also enables you to switch ruby versions without having to update the config too.

{
  "sublimelinter_executable_map": {
    "path": "/usr/local/var/rbenv/shims:/Users/luke/bin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/local/sbin:/usr/bin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/opt/X11/bin",
    "ruby": "/usr/local/var/rbenv/shims/ruby"

  }
}
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In SublimeLinter 3, rbenv (and hopefully rvm) is supported out of the box with no extra config (other than making sure they are initialized in the right place in your shell startup).

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