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public static void printFib(List<Integer> fib){
    JTextArea text = new JTextArea();
    for(Iterator<Integer> it = fib.iterator(); it.hasNext(); it.next() ){
        text.append(it.toString());
        text.append("\n");
    }
    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null,text);
}

How can I modify this to have it actually print the data contents and not the pointer address?

share|improve this question
    
Try JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, text.getText()); –  luqui Feb 5 '12 at 21:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Do you really need an interator?

for (Integer i : fib)
{
    text.append(i.toString());
    text.append("\n");
}

If for some reason you need an iterator for something else, then you use it as:

Iterator<Integer> it = fib.iterator();
while (it.hasNext())
{
    text.append(it.next().toString());
    text.append("\n");
}

Edit: To summarize comments below; Rather than getting the Integer the iterator contained via it.next(), The OP was calling the iterator's toString() method and receiving a String containing the hex representation of the iterator's hash code.

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Apparently not. I was unaware that this was possible. It doesn't change my error message tough. This results in "The method append(String) in the type JTextArea is not applicable for the arguments (Integer)" –  Geir K.H. Feb 5 '12 at 21:59
    
@user1191205 You need to use i.toString(). –  Dave Newton Feb 5 '12 at 22:01
    
Odd I guess it doesn't call toString() implicitly - editing –  Brian Roach Feb 5 '12 at 22:02
    
The pattern in implementation of iterator by OP is better then your advise. It is of course obsolete, after for each loop was introduced in Java. But in the case that we need to to use the iterator it should be done like OP wrote. Beside that your answer assume that OP know what for each loop is, i think that if he would be aware of it, it would be used. –  Damian Leszczyński - Vash Feb 5 '12 at 22:03
    
@user1191205 - for "for-each" loop was added in Java 6. it's handy :) –  Brian Roach Feb 5 '12 at 22:03

Why are you doing it like that anyway?

for (Integer i : fib) {
    text.append(i.toString());
    text.append("\n");
}

Anyway, you're appending it (not it.next()). You're printing the iterator, not what's being iterated.


If I were doing it I'd probably write the method like this; YMMV:

public static void printFib(List<Integer> fib){
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for (Integer i : fib) {
        sb.append(i).append("\n");
    }

    JTextArea text = new JTextArea(sb.toString());
    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, text);
}

Actually, I'd probably do it like this, but they make special little buses for people like me:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<Integer> fib = Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3);
    display(buildFibOutput(fib));
}

private static void display(String s){
    JTextArea text = new JTextArea(s);
    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, text);
}

private static String buildFibOutput(List<Integer> fib) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for (Integer i : fib) {
        sb.append(i).append("\n");
    }
    return sb.toString();
}
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If the are creating buses, that mean that you are not alone. –  Damian Leszczyński - Vash Feb 5 '12 at 22:43

Assuming you want to use an iterator, you need to get the next value and print that, not the iterator itslef, which you are doing. Something like

//create an iterator, then
while (it.hasNext()) {
   text.append(it.next());
   ...
}

While you can use a for loop, I think a while loop is probably simpler to understand in the context...

share|improve this answer

try this:

public static void printFib(List<Integer> fib){
    JTextArea text = new JTextArea();
    for(Integer it : fib){
        text.append(it.toString());
        text.append("\n");
    }
    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null,text);
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1; This will now display the address of text instance. –  Damian Leszczyński - Vash Feb 5 '12 at 22:25
    
Fixed by adding toString() –  John Ericksen Feb 5 '12 at 22:28

your problem is that text is JTextArea instance. After passing it to JOptionPane.showMessageDialo(null,text); over text is called method toString(), which is delivered by Object super type. To solve this problem, you need to pass to that method the content of that text instance. To do that just call method getText(), and should work.

In addition to improve your code:

I no aware how method append, works but a good practice is to use StringBuilder class to reduce the operation over immutable String objects. As the are immutable, when you need a concatenation of those you are really creating new one object, so each pass of loop will create new object. Another thing is that you are using obsolete approach, for List iteration. Since foreach loop has been introduced in Java, it should be used instead that for pattern you have implemented. The for each loop can be used over all elements, that implements interface Iterable, so improved version of your code would look like:

public static <T> void print(Iterable<T> iterable){

    if(iterator == null) { //We throw an exception if method can not operater
       throw new IllegelArgumentException("The argument iterable must not be null".
    }

    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    for(T element : iterable) { //for each loop
       sb.apppend(String.valueOf(element)); 
       sb.append("\n");
    }

    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null,sb.toString());
}

In addition the method is generic.

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And the down vote is because ? –  Damian Leszczyński - Vash Feb 5 '12 at 22:44

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