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I am writing a program which has an output requirement for the number printed to not have a repeated integer in it

i.e. it would not print 122, 161, 998, etc
but it would print any other number such as 123, 345, 742..etc

how do i go about doing this? thanks!

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3  
Is this homework? –  Andrew Cooper Feb 5 '12 at 22:35
3  
What have you tried so far? –  hmjd Feb 5 '12 at 22:35
    
@hmjd i set each digit to a spot in an array, then in nested for loops i check digit x to i. If the two counters equal each other, then i skip the condition. If x!=i, the program checks to see if check[x]==check[i], if it does, i flag it with a separate counter, and when x and i both reach their maximum i check to see if the number was flagged. If it was flagged, it does not print, otherwise, it prints. –  user1188823 Feb 5 '12 at 22:56
    
@AndrewCooper no, and the original post is somewhere on my profile id assume –  user1188823 Feb 5 '12 at 22:56
    
Please read SO Homework question policy. In particular, 1) always mark homework questions as such, 2) Make a good faith attempt to solve the problem yourself first, and 3) Ask about specific problems with your existing implementation. Read more: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/10811/… –  kkm Feb 5 '12 at 23:05

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A C-language compatible solution would be to convert the number to a string and keep a frequency count of the digits and return true if there are duplicates, e.g.:

int has_duplicate_digit(char * s) {
  char digit_count[10] = {0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0};
  for (int i=0; i<strlen(s); i++) {
    if ('0' <= s[i] && s[i] <= '9') {
      if (++digit_count[s[i]-'0'] > 1) return 1; // true
    }
  }
  return 0; // false
}

[Edit] You can also save a few bytes (and possibly some time) by using a bitset instead of an int array. For example:

#include <stdint.h>
int has_duplicate_digit2(char * s) {
  uint16_t digit_count = 0;
  for (int i=0; i<strlen(s); i++) {
    if ('0' <= s[i] && s[i] <= '9') {
      uint16_t bit = 1 << (s[i] - '0');
      if (digit_count & bit) return 1; // true
      digit_count |= bit;
    }
  }
  return 0; // false
}
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1  
1) If s contains exactly 256*n of a repeating digit, this will fail. No need to ++ an entry, just set it to 1. 2) Break out of the loop immediately upon seeing a repeated digit. Your code will examine the entire string "11...<2 million more digits>"--and there is no point in scanning on after the first repetition is encountered. –  kkm Feb 5 '12 at 23:14
    
You can immediately discard numbers with more than 10 digits (or whatever number base you're working with), because they're guaranteed to have at least one digit repeated. –  Andrew Cooper Feb 5 '12 at 23:20
    
@kkm: true true, it was a simple first pass to demonstrate the idea (while the "homework" status was unclear). the current solution should be better. –  maerics Feb 6 '12 at 5:34

You can create a std::set, loop through the digits, add them to the set, and see if the number of digits is equal to the size of the set. If it is, no numbers are repeated.

If you suspect most numbers fail to meet the requirement, you can check after each insertion whether the digit was actually added to the set or not, and immediately reject the number if it wasn't.

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1  
@SethCarnegie since this is probably homework, I didn't want to provide the actual code. –  Luchian Grigore Feb 5 '12 at 22:41
    
Oh you're right, removed. –  Seth Carnegie Feb 5 '12 at 22:42
    
this is not homework, im working on my own project, the original post is on my profile somewhere probably(new here) –  user1188823 Feb 5 '12 at 22:50
    
@user1188823 okay. Either way, this should be enough to get you started. –  Luchian Grigore Feb 5 '12 at 22:51
    
@user1188823 then I'll repost my solution, which is probably the fastest way to do it but maybe not the most efficient (see also KerrekSB's answer) std::string str(to_string(integer)); std::set<char> chars(str.begin(), str.end()); if (chars.size() == str.length()) cout << integer; –  Seth Carnegie Feb 5 '12 at 22:53

I'd use a 'bit array' to track digits: this is more a 'C-like' way of solve...

int number_orig = ...,
    number = number_orig;
    bits = 0;
bool duplicate = false;
while (number != 0 && !duplicate)
{
 int digit = number % 10;
 if (bits & (1 << digit))
   duplicate = true;
 bits |= (1 << digit);
 number /= 10;
}
if (!duplicate)
  cout << number_orig;
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A simple string-based solution: Convert, sort, uniquify, count:

#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

for (unsigned int i = 0; ; ++i)
{
    std::string sorig = std::to_string(i), suniq = sorig;
    std::sort(suniq.begin(), suniq.end());

    if (std::unique(suniq.begin(), suniq.end()) == suniq.end())
    {
        std::cout << sorig << std::endl;
    }
}
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Just convert number to string (itoa) and it will be easer to solve the core task.

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Convert the number to a string, and set up 10 bits (all zero) that represent 1 << ( digit - '0' ) you can then check for each digit whether it has been seen before, and if so return. Else set that bit.

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