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Good object-oriented design says that objects should not expose their internals. Given this is the case, what is the best way to display data?

For example, how would you go about displaying the data field after calling DoSomethingToData in a Console application?

public class Foo {
    string data;

    public void DoSomethingToData(string someParam) {
        .....
    }
}

class Program {
    static void Main(string[] items) {
        var foo = new Foo();
        foo.DoSomethingToData("blah");
        ..... // how do we write data field to console without breaking encapsulation?
    }
}

Update: I thought the best way to maintain encapsulation would be to use an observer pattern (events), but no one has mentioned it. Is this a better solution than exposing a property or method result?

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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It depends;

  • if the value relates only to the method, make it a return value of the method
  • if the value relates to the object, expose it via a property

I suspect it is the latter, so:

 public string Data { get { return data; } }

Which is simply an accessor - the equivalent of getData() in java, for example. This isn't exposing the field, but ultimately your object should expose some API to the information. It isn't meant to be a complete secret.

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What about the observer pattern? –  JontyMC Feb 6 '12 at 15:17
    
@JontyMC what about it? Frankly, that is overkill just to read some piece of info. Feel free to do that - I just don't see how it applies to the scenario. –  Marc Gravell Feb 6 '12 at 16:23
    
I gave a simple example, but the question was supposed to be a bit more general. At what point would an observer pattern be applicable? Doesn't it provide the lowest level of coupling? –  JontyMC Feb 6 '12 at 23:32
    
@JontyMC observer might be appropriate if you needed, say, some code to react to a change that it doesn't directly control (data-binding is an obvious example). Your code isn't reactive - it is procedural: run a method; now, what is the value? –  Marc Gravell Feb 7 '12 at 6:02
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You can add ToString method (or similar) to provide a string representation suitable for logging to the console.

public class Foo
{
    private string data;

    public void DoSomethingToData(string someParam) {
        .....
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return string.Format("Foo data: {0}", data);
    }
}

This makes it clear to clients of your class that the contents of the data field are not intended to be used outside the class except for debugging/logging.


Alternatively you could private a public getter property that allows direct (read-only) access to the private string, but notice that providing such a property in this way may result in clients of the class using the Data field for more general purposes other than logging.

public string Data { get { return data; } }

A final option is to use an auto-implemented property and remove the field completely (the auto-implemented property will use its own backing field):

public string Data { get; private set; }
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What about the observer pattern? –  JontyMC Feb 6 '12 at 15:16
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Some common approaches:

  • Overriding ToString() for some general textual representation of an instance (this may reflect your desired internal data or not, depends on details and context)
  • Exposing a method if calculation is performed from some specific internal data
  • Exposing a getter to immutably expose internal data
  • Use debugger and 'watch' on class instance if you only need to inspect internal behavior when debugging
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What about the observer pattern? –  JontyMC Feb 6 '12 at 15:16
    
@JontyMC ... well, Marc said it well already. I'd just add that if you use observer pattern to 'push' data, you can actually gain some additional encapsulation. But if you use it only for notification and observer pulls the data after notification, then this is not even related to your question ... –  doblak Feb 6 '12 at 19:12
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Make property in Foo class

    public string Data
    {
        get{return data;}
        set{data = value;}
    }
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Having a public setter is definitely breaking encapsulation –  JontyMC Feb 6 '12 at 15:14
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Treat data as a property. Data is a property that does not need to be stored the way it was assigned. A property can be obtained/stored thro transformation from/to its backing store. More than one property can be obtained from a combination of transformation of the innards of your private stored variables.

private double booTheBackingStore;
private int myfactor;

public String data{
  get{
    return "<data>"+booTheBackingStore*booTheBackingStore+"</data>";
  }

  set{
    String boo = parselTheXml(value);
    double booger;
    Double.tryParse(boo, out booger);
    booTheBackingStore = Math.sqrt(booger);
  }
}


public double dada{
  get{
    return exoTransform(booTheBackingStore, myfactor);
  }
  set{
    booTheBackingStore = endoTransform(value, myfactor);
  }
}

Further information:

Let's say your class is a web page view, which has edit, browse, insert, delete modes. For each of these modes, your view has to reinstantiate/rearrange widgets. Further more, you would have to reapply styles.

From the perspective of MVP, you need to decouple your presentation from your view. The view needs to expose itself in terms of public properties. So that set/get mode property would encapsulate all the innards that need to be performed on the UI. The presenter should not care how the view arranges itself. And the view should not have any process or data control logic.

Public property is an essential part to facilitate encapsulation in order to expose only the contracts between the view and the presenter.

A robust UI design would have a server-side state-machine, which communicates with the client-side state-machine, which in turn sequences the presentation agents, which in turn demands the exposition of UI-View properties. Your server should not reach out to the client view directly at all. Neither should your client state-machine. Your presenter, is directed by the state of the client to make demands of the UI-View. The presenter merely issues the demand for, say, the EDIT mode. It will not meddle with the UI-View how that EDIT MODE is implemented. The UI-View should not maintain the state of the UI.

This decoupling is to facilitate unit testing, and most importantly, modular swapping of components. So that your presentation sequence would work just as well after you have swapped your browser UI with a mobile one. Since the mobile UI would implement the various modes differently from that of the browser UI. Or the desktop UI.

You need to read up further on the concepts of component-based design and "encapsulation".

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What's XML got to do with this? Public setter breaks encapsulation –  JontyMC Feb 6 '12 at 15:15
    
XML property is a nonsensical example that a property can be anything you need it to be and does not need to correspond to your backing stored variable. –  Blessed Geek Feb 6 '12 at 16:57
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