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For example

(map #(+ 10 %1) [ 1 3 5 7 ])

Will add 10 to everything

Suppose I want to map everything to the constant 1. I have tried

(map #(1) [ 1 3 5 7 ])

But I don't understand the compiler error.

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If you get a compiler error, it's a good idea to include this in the question so that people can help you more easily. –  mikera Feb 6 '12 at 3:15
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3 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted
(map #(1) [ 1 3 5 7 ])

Won't work for two reasons:

  • #(1) is a zero-argument anonymous function, so it won't work with map (which requires a one-argument function when used with one input sequence).
  • Even if it had the right arity, it wouldn't work because it is trying to call the constant 1 as a function like (1) - try (#(1)) for example if you want to see this error.

Here are some alternatives that will work:

; use an anonymous function with one (ignored) argument
(map (fn [_] 1) [1 3 5 7])

; a hack with do that ignores the % argument 
(map #(do % 1) [1 3 5 7])

; use a for list comprehension instead
(for [x [1 3 5 7]] 1)

; use constantly from clojure.core
(map (constantly 1) [1 3 5 7])

Of the above, I think the versions using constantly or for should be preferred - these are clearer and more idiomatic.

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(map (constantly 1) [1 3 5 7]) seems like the right way to go, however, if you're just trying to get a sequence of 1s whose length is equal to the length of the sequence you're mapping over: (repeat (count [1 3 5 7]) 1) would work as well. It really all depends on the context in which you're using this as the particular problem you're trying to solve. –  Devin Walters Feb 20 '12 at 3:16
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The anonymous function #(+ 10 %1) is equivalent to:

(fn [%1]
  (+ 10 %1))

Whereas #(1) is equivalent to:

(fn []
  (1))

And trying to call 1 as a function with no args just won't work.

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I got this from clojure.org by googling the words "clojure constant function" as I am just beginning to look at clojure

(map (constantly 9) [1 2 3])

cheers

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Clojure borrowed constantly from Common Lisp: lispworks.com/documentation/HyperSpec/Body/f_cons_1.htm –  seh Feb 6 '12 at 1:10
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