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I was trying to compare how similar 2 signals using correlation via DFT (Digital Fourier Transform) in Matlab, but the correlation function gives not really predictable results. For example, if I compare those 2 pairs of signals :

  • correlation 1 and 2
  • correlation 3 and 4 (autocorrelation)

MATLAB figure screenshot

I would expect correlation peak in "corr 3 and 4" case higher than in "corr 1 and 2" case.

I as also tried to make signals "average to zero", but this did not help.

Is this the expected result or did I miss some preprocessing, etc.?

share|improve this question
    
Please re-upload the image to the standard site by using the image icon when editing your question. –  Andrey Feb 5 '12 at 23:46
    
Andrey, I can't. It's says "Oops! Your edit couldn't be submitted because: We're sorry, but as a spam prevention mechanism, new users aren't allowed to post images. Earn more than 10 reputation to post images.". If you need more trusted file-exchange source, say to me please - i will upload image there also. –  Arsen Feb 6 '12 at 5:44
    
Owww... sorry forgot about the rep. limit. –  Andrey Feb 6 '12 at 11:10

2 Answers 2

@Jonas, I was unable to find how to insert image and make good enough formatting (sorry, novice here) commenting your answer, so I am leaving this comment as "answer".

So, what I found that for following figures your method giving not expected results:

enter image description here

as you see - peak for auto-correlation is lower than for cross correlation.
Code which I used is below:

trace1=(abs(linspace(-64,64,128))<20)*200;
trace2=trace1-(abs(linspace(-64,64,128))<10)*50;
trace1=trace1-(abs(linspace(-64,64,128))<10)*100;

subplot(321);
plot(trace1); grid on;
subplot(322); 
plot(trace2); grid on;
subplot(323);
plot(xcorr(trace1,trace2)); grid on;
title('unnormalized cross-correlation');
subplot(324);
plot(xcorr(trace2,trace2)); grid on;
title('unnormalized autocorrelation');

subplot(325);
plot(xcorr(trace1/sum(trace1(:)),trace2/sum(trace2(:)))); grid on;
title('normalized cross-correlation');
subplot(326);
plot(xcorr(trace2/sum(trace2(:)),trace2/sum(trace2(:)))); grid on;
title('normalized autocorrelation');
share|improve this answer

You need to normalize your data traces - i.e. divide them by their respective integrals before correlating. The following code demonstrates that when you normalize your data traces, the autocorrelation indeed gives you the larger value:

%# producing your data
trace1=(abs(linspace(-64,64,128))<20)*200;
trace2=trace1-(abs(linspace(-64,64,128))<10)*50;
figure;
subplot(321);
plot(trace1);
subplot(322);
plot(trace2);
subplot(323);
plot(xcorr(trace1,trace2))
title('unnormalized cross-correlation');
subplot(324);
plot(xcorr(trace2,trace2))
title('unnormalized autocorrelation');
%
%# what you should be doing:
subplot(325);
plot(xcorr(trace1/sum(trace1(:)),trace2/sum(trace2(:))))
title('normalized cross-correlation');
subplot(326);
plot(xcorr(trace2/sum(trace2(:)),trace2/sum(trace2(:))))
title('normalized autocorrelation');

leading to

figure screenshot - produced using the code above

where I zoomed in on the peaks to show the normalized autocorrelation has a higher peak than the normalized cross-correlation.

share|improve this answer
    
Jonas, thanks for your answer. I was also thinking about normalization. My workaround was to calculate Euclidean Distance between normalized signals (one of them shifted by correlation maximum) - Euclidean Distance will be zero for auto-correlation in correlation peak. I have 2 more question to you: -what is physical meaning of dividing at integral, why not just divide at maximum ? To make signals same-powered? -integral(sum) may give zero (or close to this in case of y-values can be negative. I believe - getting sum of absolute values is acceptable. –  Arsen Feb 7 '12 at 22:42
    
Physical interpretation will depend on your actual problem - I'm afraid I can't help you with that. Remember this is a programming website... –  Jonas Heidelberg Feb 8 '12 at 15:29

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