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I have made a class to try exceptions:

class precExcp:exception
{
    public:
    virtual const char* what()
    {
        return "Precision must be positive";
    }
};

The problem is that when an exception is launched, the instructions flow doesn't stop. I don't know is this is c++ default behaviour. If yes, what to do if I want to interrupt instructions flow when an exception is caugth? This is an example of what I do in main:

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    try
    {
        if(1)
            throw precExcp();
    }
    catch(precExcp& e)
    {
        cerr << e.what() <<endl;
    }
    cout << "hello" <<endl;
}

On the screen the "hello" string is printed, is that normal? How to avoid this?

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1  
Make sure to do class precExcp : public exception –  Seth Carnegie Feb 5 '12 at 23:55
1  
Did you try returning inside the catch? –  George Feb 5 '12 at 23:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Based on what I can understand from your question, if you want the "hello" output to be skipped, put it in the try block.

try
{
   if(1)
       throw precExcp(); // throwing here will skip all remaining 
                         // instructions in the try block
    cout << "hello" <<endl;
}
catch(precExcp& e)
{
    cerr << e.what() <<endl;
}

Also note that this isn't Java or Python. C++ exception-handling generally doesn't require you to define or catch too many different exception-types, as your main source of recovery is going to be the destructor (@see RAII) which often eliminates the need to have multiple catch branches (as well as a finally block). Often you can just catch const std::exception& (make precExcp a subclass of it) and only in some rare cases do you need more granular checking than that.

You can also rethrow:

try
{
   if(1)
       throw precExcp(); // throwing here will skip all remaining 
                         // instructions in the try block
}
catch(precExcp& e)
{
    cerr << e.what() <<endl;
    throw; // throw the original exception
}

However, if you do this in main and have no catch block to catch that second throw, it's going to crash with an unhandled exception which may or may not be what you are seeking.

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If you catch an exception, it is considered handled and execution resumes at the end of the try/catch block.

If you want the exception to continue up the chain further (and potentially cause the program to halt if it is not caught), then add a throw to the catch:

catch(precExcp& e)
{
    cerr << e.what() <<endl;
    throw;
}

And if you want to halt the program there instead of propagating the exception upwards or letting execution resume, you can call exit (or return in this case, but only because you're in main).

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oh, right, pretty dumb :) –  Luchian Grigore Feb 6 '12 at 0:02

Yes, that's normal: You caught the exception in the catch block, so the exception does not propagate outside the try/catch-block in which it was raised.

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This is normal behavior, your unstable code is placed in try block, when something go not like should then catch block is executed when you can handle exception, after this process you can use optional finally block that is called after try in success and in fail after catch. After that code executing normally, code execution is stopped only in try block, you need return when you want stop executing this function (in catch block).

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Well, you caught the exception that was thrown, so it is normal. Put the part of the code you don't want to execute if an exception occurs inside the try block:

try {
    throw precExcp();
    cout << "hello" <<endl;
}
catch(precExcp &e) {
    // ...
}
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