Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

SOLVED: A good friend of mine wrote the following program for me:

filename="my_input_file"
context="channel"               # this is the key which separates the blocks in the input file
desired_column_separator=","    # this will separate the columns in the output file
output_prefix="modified_"       # prefix for the output file


if [ -d ./tmp ]
then

echo " "
echo "***WARNING***"
echo "I want to use and delete a ./tmp/ directory, but one already exists... please remove/rename it, or alter my code***"
echo " " 
exit
fi


mkdir ./tmp
cd ./tmp

csplit -z -n 4 ../$filename  /$context/ {*} 1> /dev/null

filenum=`ls -1 ./ | wc -l`
limit=`echo "$filenum - 1" | bc -l`
lines=`wc -l < xx0000`

touch tmp.dat


        for j in `seq 1 $lines`
        do

    oldstring=''

                for i in `seq 0 $limit`
                do

                inputNo=`printf "%04d" $i`
                string=`head -n $j 'xx'$inputNo | tail -n 1`

        oldstring=$oldstring$string$desired_column_separator

                done

        finalstring=`echo $oldstring | tr -d '\r' | tr -d '\n'`  

        echo "working on line "$j" out of "$lines
                echo -n $finalstring >> tmp.dat                
                echo -e "\r" >> tmp.dat

        done

mv tmp.dat ../$output_prefix$filename
cd ..
rm -r -f ./tmp/

echo "...done!"

Original: I know splitting text files has been done to death on this forum, but I couldn't find a method specific to my problem. I want to split a large file (>200mb) into columns on a text line, but the 'split' function puts every column in its own file. 3,000-odd individual files text are a pain to load into other programs, to be honest. On top of this, I would also like to extract a part of the text file to use as the header for my data (the last part of line 4). The initial file consists of a single column, like so:

channel names:
03/02/2012 12:03:03 - TDS3k(CH1)
start times:
03/02/2012 12:08:02.311422
dt:
0.000000
data:
-8.000000E-4
-8.000000E-4
-1.600000E-3
... (9,994 lines omitted)
-2.400000E-3
-1.600000E-3
-2.400000E-3
channel names:
03/02/2012 12:03:03 - TDS3k(CH1)
start times:
03/02/2012 12:33:11.169533
dt:
0.000000
data:
-8.000000E-4
-1.600000E-3
-1.600000E-3
... (another 9,997 lines omitted)

I would like it to look like so:

channel names:                     channel names:
03/02/2012 12:03:03 - TDS3k(CH1)   03/02/2012 12:03:03 - TDS3k(CH1)
start times:                       start times:
03/02/2012 12:08:02.311422         03/02/2012 12:33:11.169533
dt:                                dt:
0.000000                           0.000000
data:                              data:
-8.000000E-4                       -8.000000E-4   ...
-8.000000E-4                       -1.600000E-3   ...
-1.600000E-3                       -1.600000E-3   ...
...                                ...

I suspect getting the split in the right place is easier to do than the header, but I'm not good enough to do either.

Thanks in advance

EDIT: I'm not using any particular language yet. I just need the data in a format where I can analyse it in R. I'll go with whatever you guys can suggest that will work.

share|improve this question
1  
What programing language do you want to use? –  ChrisWue Feb 6 '12 at 0:11
    
You know, you might want to give just a little hint as to what tool (language/spreadsheet/database/whatever) you're using for this. –  Hot Licks Feb 6 '12 at 0:11
    
I'm not using any particular language. 'sed' and 'awk' were both suggested by friends, but I couldn't get them to work. I'll be loading it into R at some point. –  user1191276 Feb 6 '12 at 3:32

1 Answer 1

What language are you using? How many 'data' entries are there per entry?

Using python, the easiest way to do it is to first break the data up into 'entries', and then write a parsing function for each entry to produce only the values you wish to see in your final output. Then simply join final output, or write it using the csv module.

input = """channel names:
03/02/2012 12:03:03 - TDS3k(CH1)
start times:
03/02/2012 12:33:11.169533
dt:
0.000000
data:
-8.000000E-4
-1.600000E-3
-1.600000E-3
channel names:
03/02/2012 12:03:03 - TDS3k(CH1)
start times:
03/02/2012 12:33:11.169533
dt:
0.000000
data:
-8.000000E-4
-1.600000E-3
-1.600000E-3
"""

LINES_PER_ENTRY = 10

def parseEntry(entry):
    return entry

raw = input.split('\n')

entries =  [raw[i*LINES_PER_ENTRY:(i+1)*LINES_PER_ENTRY] for i in range(len(raw)/10)]


parsed_entries = [parseEntry(entry) for entry in entries]

outfile = open('outfile.txt','w')
for parsed_entry in parsed_entries:
    outfile.write('\t'.join(parsed_entry) + "\n")
print parsed_entries
share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to do analysis with R, but I need the data to be in the right format first. I'll go with whatever language works. A friend suggested 'sed' and 'awk', but I haven't been able to get either of them to work. Will this output the data as columns in a single file? The total number of rows per output column (including text and header) should be 10007, but that might vary, so using a fixed entry length is risky. Thank you for your help, I'll look into Python when I'm awake enough tomorrow. Also, what on earth is up with the "5 minute edit" thing? It's really annoying. –  user1191276 Feb 6 '12 at 0:57
    
In that case, can you provide a larger example of what you want to parse? –  wcdolphin Feb 6 '12 at 19:55
    
If you want, but I don't see what it'll do. Maybe I can describe it a bit better: My data consists of several 'instances' in one column. Each 'instance' consists of 7 lines of text (as shown in the op), followed by 10,000 lines of numbers. The 'instances' are concatenated. –  user1191276 Feb 7 '12 at 10:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.