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Let's say I've got the following data in one-to-many tables city and person, respectively:

SELECT city.*, person.* FROM city, person WHERE city.city_id = person.person_city_id;
+---------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------------+
| city_id | city_name   | person_id | person_name | person_city_id |
+---------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------------+
|       1 | chicago     |         1 | charles     |              1 |
|       1 | chicago     |         2 | celia       |              1 |
|       1 | chicago     |         3 | curtis      |              1 |
|       1 | chicago     |         4 | chauncey    |              1 |
|       2 | new york    |         5 | nathan      |              2 |
|       3 | los angeles |         6 | luke        |              3 |
|       3 | los angeles |         7 | louise      |              3 |
|       3 | los angeles |         8 | lucy        |              3 |
|       3 | los angeles |         9 | larry       |              3 |
+---------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------------+
9 rows in set (0.00 sec)

And I want to select a single record from person for each unique city using some particular logic. For example:

SELECT city.*, person.* FROM city, person WHERE city.city_id = person.person_city_id
GROUP BY city_id ORDER BY person_name DESC
;

The implication here is that within each city, I want to get the lexigraphically greatest value, eg:

+---------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------------+
| city_id | city_name   | person_id | person_name | person_city_id |
+---------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------------+
|       2 | new york    |         5 | nathan      |              2 |
|       3 | los angeles |         6 | luke        |              3 |
|       1 | chicago     |         1 | curtis      |              1 |
+---------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------------+

The actual output I get, however, is:

+---------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------------+
| city_id | city_name   | person_id | person_name | person_city_id |
+---------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------------+
|       2 | new york    |         5 | nathan      |              2 |
|       3 | los angeles |         6 | luke        |              3 |
|       1 | chicago     |         1 | charles     |              1 |
+---------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------------+

I understand that the reason for this discrepancy is that MySQL first performs the GROUP BY, then it does the ORDER BY. This is unfortunate for me, as I want the GROUP BY to have selection logic in which record it picks.

I can workaround this by using some nested SELECT statements:

SELECT c.*, p.* FROM city c,
    ( SELECT p_inner.* FROM
        ( SELECT * FROM person ORDER BY person_city_id, person_name DESC ) p_inner
        GROUP BY person_city_id ) p
    WHERE c.city_id = p.person_city_id;
+---------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------------+
| city_id | city_name   | person_id | person_name | person_city_id |
+---------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------------+
|       1 | chicago     |         3 | curtis      |              1 |
|       2 | new york    |         5 | nathan      |              2 |
|       3 | los angeles |         6 | luke        |              3 |
+---------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------------+

This seems like it would be terribly inefficient when the person table grows arbitrarily large. I assume the inner SELECT statements don't know about outermost WHERE filters. Is this true?

What is the accepted best approach for doing what effectively is an ORDER BY before the GROUP BY?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The usual way to do this (in MySQL) is with a join of your table to itself.

First to get the greatest person_name per city (ie per person_city_id in the person table):

SELECT p.*
FROM person p
LEFT JOIN person p2
 ON p.person_city_id = p2.person_city_id
 AND p.person_name < p2.person_name
WHERE p2.person_name IS NULL

This joins person to itself within each person_city_id (your GROUP BY variable), and also pairs the tables up such that p2's person_name is greater than p's person_name.

Since it's a left join if there's a p.person_name for which there is no greater p2.person_name (within that same city), then the p2.person_name will be NULL. These are precisely the "greatest" person_names per city.

So to join your other information (from city) to it, just do another join:

SELECT c.*,p.*
FROM person p
LEFT JOIN person p2
 ON p.person_city_id = p2.person_city_id
 AND p.person_name < p2.person_name
LEFT JOIN city c                           -- add in city table
 ON p.person_city_id = c.city_id           -- add in city table
WHERE p2.person_name IS NULL               -- ORDER BY c.city_id if you like
share|improve this answer
    
If there is a filter such as WHERE city_id=3, does this trickle down and make the joins to person more efficient? Or should there maybe be an index added to person on person_city_id,person_name? –  user655321 Feb 6 '12 at 0:49
    
I think it makes the join more efficient if you add it into the join condition, but not so much in the WHERE clause. Re indices, hopefully someone here with more mysql index foo can help - I know the left join method is widely accepted as more efficient than the subquery method (for "greatest n per group"), but when it gets to the nitty gritty of indices I don't know much at all. –  mathematical.coffee Feb 6 '12 at 1:05
    
This works well in that it doesn't limit me to selecting only the max value (eg, person_name) -- I can get the whole row associated with that max value. It's also more straightforward than having a slew of nested SELECTS, and having thought about this for a while, I'm sure this does benefit from additional WHERE clauses. –  user655321 Feb 6 '12 at 5:20

Your "solution" is not valid SQL but it works in MySQL. You can't be sure however if it will break with a future change in the query optimizer code. It could be slightly improved to have just 1 level of nesting (still not valid SQL):

--- Option 1 ---
SELECT 
       c.*
     , p.* 
FROM 
      city AS c
  JOIN
      ( SELECT * 
        FROM person 
        ORDER BY person_city_id
               , person_name DESC 
      ) AS p
    ON  c.city_id = p.person_city_id
GROUP BY p.person_city_id

Another way (valid SQL syntax, works in other DBMS, too) is to make a subquery to select the last name for every city and then join:

--- Option 2 ---
SELECT 
       c.*
     , p.* 
FROM 
      city AS c
  JOIN
      ( SELECT person_city_id
             , MAX(person_name) AS person_name 
        FROM person 
        GROUP BY person_city_id
      ) AS pmax
    ON  c.city_id = pmax.person_city_id
  JOIN 
      person AS p
    ON  p.person_city_id = pmax.person_city_id
    AND p.person_name = pmax.person_name

Another way is the self join (of the table person), with the < trick that @mathematical_coffee describes.

--- Option 3 ---
  see @mathematical-coffee's answer

Yet another way is to use a LIMIT 1 subquery for the join of city with person:

--- Option 4 ---
SELECT 
       c.*
     , p.* 
FROM 
      city AS c
  JOIN
      person AS p
    ON
      p.person_id =
      ( SELECT person_id
        FROM person AS pm 
        WHERE pm.person_city_id = c.city_id
        ORDER BY person_name DESC
        LIMIT 1
      ) 

This will run a subquery (on table person) for every city and it will be efficient if you have a (person_city_id, person_name) index for InnoDB engine or an (person_city_id, person_name, person_id) for MyISAM engine.


There is one major difference between these options:

Oprions 2 and 3 will return all tied results (if you have two or more persons in a city with same name that is alphabetically last, then both or all will be shown).

Options 1 and 4 will return one result per city, even if there are ties. You can choose which one by altering the ORDER BY clause.


Which option is more efficient depends also on the distribution of your data, so the best way is to try them all, check their execution plans and find the best indexes that work for each one. An index on (person_city_id, person_name) will most likely be good for any of those queries.

With distribution I mean:

  • Do you have few cities with many persons per city? (I would think that options 2 and 4 would behave better in this case)

  • Or many cities with few persons per city? (option 3 may be better with such data).

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