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an undirected graph from is represented as a pair of nodes:

edges = (A,B),(B,C),(D,E),(F,E),(G,E),(G,I),(H,G)

What should be the best data structure in python to find the components of a

specific sub graph given a starting edge (e.g.

(D,E))?. I am thinking in using depth first search as the searching algorithm.

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1  
Are you using a library such as networkx? Or just python? – Lostsoul Feb 6 '12 at 3:59

Have you checked out the networkx library? If you're not starting from scratch it provides great primitives data structure for graphs of all shapes and sizes.

Included is the Graph.subgraph method which you can read up on here.

From the docs:

>>> G = nx.Graph()   # or DiGraph, MultiGraph, MultiDiGraph, etc
>>> G.add_path([0,1,2,3])
>>> H = G.subgraph([0,1,2])
>>> H.edges()
[(0, 1), (1, 2)]
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If you just want a lightweight data structure, you can use a doubly linked (effectively undirected) pair of dictionaries.

Node Structure:

{"name": "something" , "connections": [list of connected nodes]}

some nodes from your data:

e = {"name": "E"}
d = {"name": "D"}
f = {"name": "F"}
g = {"name": "G"}

e["connections"] = [d,f,g]
#... etc with whatever code you want to build the graph itself

Then use whatever algorithm you want. If you want to know the algorithm, please adjust your question. As mvanveen mentioned, use a graph library if you can. This is well-tread territory.

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What I really want is to find connectedness for a particular sub graph given a starting node. The set of pair of nodes: edges = (A,B),(B,C),(D,E),(F,E),(G,E),(G,I),(H,G) really represent two separate trees. I'd like to use a recursive dfs to find the connnected components. I tried using dictionaries of the form: {'A':['B']..}, but these represent directed graphs, what I have are edges without direction. – user1191510 Feb 6 '12 at 15:04
    
What I really want is to find connectedness for a particular sub graph given a starting node. The set of pair of nodes: edges = (A,B),(B,C),(D,E),(F,E),(G,E),(G,I),(H,G) really represent two separate trees. I'd like to use a recursive dfs to find the connnected components. I tried using dictionaries of the form: {'A':['B']..}, but these represent directed graphs, what I have are edges without direction. I'd like to avoid using specific libraries for graphs. – user1191510 Feb 6 '12 at 15:15
    
So do you need the algorithm or just the data structure? Sorry I'm still not clear. As for the structure I presented, unless I misunderstand something, there is no practical difference between a graph with each edge being undirected and each edge being a pair of directed edges. – KobeJohn Feb 6 '12 at 15:21
    
Also, what is the reason for avoiding the library mvanveen suggested? Maybe you want to learn how to do it yourself first? – KobeJohn Feb 6 '12 at 15:23
    
I have some code from C that might work in python for the dfs algorithm, what I need is how to represent the edges in python (a simple list? a dictionary?). Yes, I'd like to learn how to do it first, then I might use a more general library. If you already have the algorithm in python that might help also. – user1191510 Feb 6 '12 at 18:25

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