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I have a class BigStructure that builds a complicated data structure from some input. It also includes methods that perform operations on that data structure.

The class grew too large, so I'm trying to split it in two to help maintainability. I was thinking that it would be natural to move the operations into a new class, say class OperationsOnBigStructure.

Unfortunately, since class BigStructure is quite unique, OperationsOnBigStructure cannot be reasonably reused with any other class. In a sense, it's forever tied to BigStructure. For example, a typical operation may consist of traversing a big structure instance in a way that is only meaningful for a BigStructure object.

Now, I have two classes, but it feels like I haven't improved anything. In fact, I made things slightly more complicated, since I now need to pass the BigStructure object to the methods in OperationsOnBigStructure, and they need to store that object internally.

Should I just live with one big class?

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How big is big? – Blender Feb 6 '12 at 4:42
4  
From what you've said, it sounds like you should live with one big class. However, if you can post this class, we'll be able to help you much better. – Nick ODell Feb 6 '12 at 4:43
    
I agree with the other commenters: sometimes you end up with a big class and that's just life. If this is the worst of your problems you are doing better than average. – Peter Rowell Feb 6 '12 at 5:20
    
@Blender: the class is about 600 lines of code (not counting blanks/comments), with about 30 methods. And the bad thing is that it can only grow larger... I may post it, if I manage to clean it up enough for it to make sense in isolation. – max Feb 6 '12 at 6:49
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I was thinking that it would be natural to move the operations into a new class, say class OperationsOnBigStructure.

I would say, that's quite the opposite of what Object Oriented Design is all about. The idea behind OOD is to keep data and methods together.

Usually a (too) big class is a sign of too much responsibility: i.e. your class is simply doing too much. It seems that you first defined a data structure and then added functions to it. You could try to break the data structure into substructures and define independent classes for these (i.e. use aggregation). But without knowing more it's difficult to say...

Of course sometimes, a program just runs fine with one big class. But if you feel incomfortable with it yourself, that's a strong hint to start doing something against ...

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The solution I came up with for this problem was to create a package to contain the class. Something along the lines of:

MyClass/
    __init__.py
    method_a.py
    method_b.py
    ...

in my case __init__.py contains the actual datastructure definition, but no methods. To 'attach' the methods to the class I just import them into the class' namespace.

Contents of method_a.py:

def method_a(self, msg):
    print 'a: %s' % str(msg)

Contents of __init__.py:

class MyClass():
    from method_a import method_a
    from method_b import method_b

    def method_c(self):
        print 'c'

In the python console:

>>> from MyClass import MyClass
>>> a = MyClass()
>>> dir(a)
['__doc__', '__module__', 'method_a', 'method_b', 'method_c']
>>> a.method_a('hello world')
a: hello world
>>> a.method_c()
c

This has worked for me.

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This looks like exactly the solution I'm going to take with my project, but I don't know how standard this is. Is this solution pythonic? Have you experienced any issues because of this code structure? – Nick Sweet Sep 14 '15 at 16:19
1  
@NickSweet I've been using this solution for about 2 years in production and so far I've been fine. It's odd that there doesn't seem to be a prefered method (a PEP) for doing this. – Emanuel Ey Sep 15 '15 at 9:05
1  
@NickSweet Have you taken this route on your project? I'm curious to know about your experience with it. – Emanuel Ey Oct 15 '15 at 12:49
1  
I did, and it worked great! There were a few issues I had with circular dependencies, but I resolved them by just importing within functions that required the external functions/methods. – Nick Sweet Oct 15 '15 at 13:24
    
Thanks for your feedback! I guess I'll keep on doing it this way as well :) – Emanuel Ey Oct 15 '15 at 13:28

At first make sure you have high test coverage, this will boost your refactoring experience. If there are no or not enough unittests, create them.

Then make reasonable small refactoring steps and keep the unittests working:

As a rule of thumb try to keep the core functionality together in the big class. Try not to draw a border if there is too much coupling.

At first refactor sub tasks to functions in seperate libraries. If it is possible to abstract things, move that functionality to libraries.

Then make the code more clean and reorder it, until you can see the structure it really 'wants' to have.

If in the end you feel you can still cut it in two classes and this is quite natural according to the inner structure, then consider really doing it.

Always keep the test coverage high enough and refactor always after you made some changes. AFter some time you will have much more beautiful code.

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"""Now, I have two classes, but it feels like I haven't improved anything. In fact, I made things slightly more complicated, since I now need to pass the BigStructure object to the methods in OperationsOnBigStructure, and they need to store that object internally."""

I think a natural approach there would be to have "OperationsOnBigStructure" to inherit from bigstructure - therefore you have all the relevant code in one place, without the extra parameter passing,as the data it needs to operate on will be contained in "self".

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For example, a typical operation may consist of traversing a big structure instance in a way that is only meaningful for a BigStructure object.

Perhaps you could write some generators as methods of BigStructure that would do the grunt work of traversal. Then, OperationsOnBigStructure could just loop over an iterator when doing a task, which might improve readability of the code.

So, by having two classes instead of one, you are raising the level of abstraction at two stages.

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