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I'm creating a mail "bot" for one of my web services that will periodically collect a queue of e-mail messages to be sent from a PHP script and send them via Google's SMTP servers. The PHP script returns the messages in this format:

test@example.com:Full Name:shortname\ntest2@example.com:Another Full Name:anothershortname\ntest@example.com:Foo:bar

I need to "convert" that into something like this:

{
    "test@example.com": [
        [
            "Full Name",
            "shortname"
        ],
        [
            "Foo",
            "bar"
        ]
    ],
    "test2@example.com": [
        [
            "Another Full Name",
            "anothershortname"
        ]
    ]
}

Notice I need to have only one key per e-mail, even if there are multiple instances of an address. I know I can probably do it with two consecutive loops, one to build the first level of the dictionary and the second to populate it, but there should be a way to do it in one shot. This is my code so far:

raw = "test@example.com:Full Name:shortname\ntest2@example.com:Another Full Name:anothershortname\ntest@example.com:Foo:bar"

print raw

newlines = raw.split("\n")

print newlines

merged = {}
for message in newlines:
    message = message.split(":")
    merged[message[0]].append([message[1], message[2]])

print merged

I'm getting a KeyError on the last line of the loop, which I take to mean the key has to exist before appending anything to it (appending to a nonexistent key will not create that key).

I'm new to Python and not really familiar with lists and dictionaries yet, so your help is much appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
+1 for the effort. – Abhranil Das Feb 6 '12 at 5:13
    
The structure you give isn't valid. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Feb 6 '12 at 5:13
    
@IgnacioVazquez-Abrams - As I said I'm not all that familiar with dictionaries and lists yet; that's more of a pseudo-structure (I think that's actually valid JSON). Just something for me to visualize. – Steven Zezulak Feb 6 '12 at 5:16
    
Oddly enough, approximately 99% of all valid JSON is valid Python as well. (But that's not valid JSON either.) – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Feb 6 '12 at 5:18
    
Now it's valid JSON ^_^ – Steven Zezulak Feb 6 '12 at 5:25
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are right about the error. So you have to check if the key is present. 'key' in dict returns True if 'key' is found in dict, otherwise False. Implementing this, here's your full code (with the debugging print statements removed):

raw = "test@example.com:Full Name:shortname\ntest2@example.com:Another Full Name:anothershortname\ntest@example.com:Foo:bar"
newlines = raw.split("\n")
merged = {}
for message in newlines:
    message = message.split(":")
    if message[0] in merged:
        merged[message[0]].append([message[1], message[2]])
    else:
        merged[message[0]]=[[message[1], message[2]]]    
print merged

Notice the extra brackets for the nested list on the second last line.

share|improve this answer

May work as:

for message in newlines:
    message = message.split(":")
    temp = []
    temp.append(message[1])
    temp.append(message[2])
    merged[message[0]] = temp

Actually maybe:

for message in newlines:
    message = message.split(":")
    temp = []
    temp.append(message[1])
    temp.append(message[2])
    if message[0] not in merged:
        merged[message[0]] = []
    merged[message[0]].append(temp)
share|improve this answer

I see that you've already accepted an answer, but maybe you're anyhow interested that what you're doing can be easily achieved with defaultdict:

from collections import defaultdict
raw = "test@example.com:Full Name:shortname\ntest2@example.com:Another Full Name:anothershortname\ntest@example.com:Foo:bar"

merged = defaultdict(list)
for line in raw.split('\n'):
    line = line.split(':')
    merged[line[0]].append(line[1:])
share|improve this answer

Just check for presence of key, if it is not present, create the key, if it is present, then append the data to existing list.

if(messsage[0] in merged):
     merged[message[0]] = [message[1],[message[2]]
else:
     merged[message[0]].append([[message[1], message[2]])
share|improve this answer
    
Bracket mismatch. On the second line of code, that should be [[message[1],message[2]]]. – Abhranil Das Feb 6 '12 at 5:30
    
thanks.corrected. – DhruvPathak Feb 6 '12 at 5:34

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