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This is an interview question.

Suppose that there are 1 million elements in the table and 997 buckets of unordered lists. Further suppose that the hash function distributes keys with equal probability (i.e., each bucket has 1000 elements).

What is the worst case time to find an element which is not in the table? To find one which is in the table? How can you improve this?

My solution: The worst case time of finding an element not in table and in table are all O(1000). 1000 is the length of the unsorted list.

Improve it : (0) straightforward, increase bucket numbers > 1 million. (1) each bucket holds a second hashtable, which use a different hash function to compute hash value for the second table. it will be O(1) (2) each bucket holds a binary search tree. It will be O(lg n).

is it possible to make a trade-off between space and time. Keep both of them in a reasonable range.

Any better ideas ? thanks !

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4  
O(1000) is O(1). –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 6 '12 at 6:27
    
I know but I want to show the worst case time. thanks –  user1002288 Feb 6 '12 at 6:40
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@R.MartinhoFernandes: Its not rally O(1000) though is it. (Assuming each bucket is a list) Its more like O(n/1000) => O(n). When you hash so excissively overloaded it is not really a hash anymore it is a set of linked lists (or whatever the structure is that implements the bucket). –  Loki Astari Feb 6 '12 at 6:43
    
A hash with each bucket implemented as a hash will take the same amount of space as a single big hash. –  Loki Astari Feb 6 '12 at 6:50
    
@LokiAstari: plus a small overhead, of course. –  Matthieu M. Feb 6 '12 at 7:15

4 Answers 4

The simplest and most obvious improvement would be to increase the number of buckets in the hash table to something like 1.2 million -- at least assuming your hash function can generate numbers in that range (which it typically will).

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I agree though I'd suggest more like 50,000 buckets or using an algorithm (such as Lawson's Algorithm) that adjusts the number of buckets dynamically. –  David Schwartz Feb 6 '12 at 6:30
    
@David, How to do it dynamically ? hashtable resizing cost is very high O(n). thanks ! –  user1002288 Feb 6 '12 at 6:42
    
I would suggest picking a bucket count that is a prime number (just in case the hashing algorithm used is bad). 999,983 –  Loki Astari Feb 6 '12 at 6:45
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@user1002288 It's not O(N). If done properly, it's O(1). Larson's algorithm, for example, never adds or removes more than one bucket at a time. It does it by splitting a bucket or joining two buckets. At most, the objects in the affected buckets need to be operated on. The number of objects in a bucket is independent of n, so the resize is O(1). –  David Schwartz Feb 6 '12 at 6:55
    
@David: why would you suggest 50,000? –  Tony D Feb 7 '12 at 8:57

Obviously increasing the bucket number improves the performance. Assuming this is no an option (for whatever reason) I suggest the following:

Normally the hash table consists of buckets, each holds a linked list (points to its head). You may however create a hash table, buckets of which hold a binary search tree (pointer to its root) rather than the list.

So that you'll have a hybrid of a hash table and the binary tree. Once I've implemented such thing. I didn't have a limitation on the number of buckets in the hash table, however I didn't know the number of elements from the beginning, plus I had no information about the quality of the hash function. Hence, I created a hash table with reasonable number of buckets, and the rest of the ambiguity was solved by the binary tree.

If N is the number of elements, and M is the number of buckets, then the complexity grows as O[log(N/M)], in case of equal distribution.

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If you can't use another data structure or a larger table there are still options:

If the active set of elements is closer to 1000 than 1M you can improve the average successful lookup time by moving each element you find to the front of its list. That will allow it to be found quickly when it is reused.

Similarly if there is a set of misses that happens frequently you can cache the negative result (this can just be a special kind of entry in the hash table).

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Suppose that there are 1 million elements in the table and 997 buckets of unordered lists. Further suppose that the hash function distributes keys with equal probability (i.e., each bucket has 1000 elements).

That doesn't quite add up, but let's run with it....

What is the worst case time to find an element which is not in the table? To find one which is in the table? How can you improve this?

The worst (and best = only) case for missing elements is that you hash to a bucket then go through inspecting all the elements in that specific list (i.e. 1000) then fail. If they want big-O notation, by definition that describes how performance varies with the number of elements N, so we have to make an assumption about how the # buckets varies with N too: my guess is that the 997 buckets is a fixed amount, and is not going to be increased if the number of elements increases. The number of comparisons is therefore N/997, which - being a linear factor - is still O(N).

My solution: The worst case time of finding an element not in table and in table are all O(1000). 1000 is the length of the unsorted list.

Nope - you're thinking of the number of comparisons - but big-O notation is about scalability.

Improve it : (0) straightforward, increase bucket numbers > 1 million. (1) each bucket holds a second hashtable, which use a different hash function to compute hash value for the second table. it will be O(1) (2) each bucket holds a binary search tree. It will be O(lg n).

is it possible to make a trade-off between space and time. Keep both of them in a reasonable range.

Well yes - average collisions relates to the number of entries and buckets. If you want very few collisions, you'd have well over 1 million entries in the table, but that gets wasteful of memory, though for large objects you can have an index or pointer to the actual object. An alternative is to look for faster collision handling mechanisms, such as trying a series of offsets from the hashed-to bucket (using % to map the displacements back into the table size), rather than resorting to some heap using linked lists. Rehashing is another alternative, given lower re-collision rates but typically needing more CPU, and having an arbitrarily long list of good hashing algorithms is problematic.

Hash tables within hash tables is totally pointless and remarkably wasteful of memory. Much better to use a fraction of that space to reduce collisions in the outer hash table.

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