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I'd like to make a record as an object's property. The problem is that when I change one of the fields of this record, the object isn't aware of the change.

type
  TMyRecord = record
    SomeField: Integer;
  end;

  TMyObject = class(TObject)
  private
    FSomeRecord: TMyRecord;
    procedure SetSomeRecord(const Value: TMyRecord);
  public
    property SomeRecord: TMyRecord read FSomeRecord write SetSomeRecord;
  end;

And then if I do...

MyObject.SomeRecord.SomeField:= 5;

...will not work.

So how do I make the property setting procedure 'catch' when one of the record's fields is written to? Perhaps some trick in how to declare the record?

More Info

My goal is to avoid having to create a TObject or TPersistent with an OnChange event (such as the TFont or TStringList). I'm more than familiar with using objects for this, but in an attempt to cleanup my code a little, I'm seeing if I can use a Record instead. I just need to make sure my record property setter can be called properly when I set one of the record's fields.

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Is this where a packed record comes in handy possibly? –  Jerry Dodge Feb 6 '12 at 9:09
1  
packed or otherwise is beside the point. That just controls layout and alignment of the record. The fundamental issue is the difference between value types and reference types. In fact, the code in your question does not even compile. –  David Heffernan Feb 6 '12 at 9:20
    
@DavidHeffernan Very true, I actually didn't put that code in Delphi, typed it directly here. –  Jerry Dodge Feb 6 '12 at 9:22

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Consider this line:

MyObject.SomeRecord.SomeField := NewValue;

This is in fact a compile error:

[DCC Error]: E2064 Left side cannot be assigned to

Your actual code is probably something like this:

MyRecord := MyObject.SomeRecord;
MyRecord.SomeField := NewValue;

What happens here is that you copy the value of the record type to the local variable MyRecord. You then modify a field of this local copy. That does not modify the record held in MyObject. To do that you need to invoke the property setter.

MyRecord := MyObject.SomeRecord;
MyRecord.SomeField := NewValue;
MyObject.SomeRecord := MyRecord;

Or switch to using a reference type, i.e. a class, rather than a record.

To summarise, the problem with your current code is that SetSomeRecord is not called and instead you are modifying a copy of the record. And this is because a record is a value type as opposed to being a reference type.

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+1 So this means that there is absolutely no way to make a record property setter catch the modification of its fields? Bummer :( –  Jerry Dodge Feb 6 '12 at 9:17
    
That is correct. –  David Heffernan Feb 6 '12 at 9:26
    
That is also true for object-based properties, which is why classes like TFont, TStrings, etc have an OnChange event - the parent component assigns an internal event handler to that event so changes to sub-properties can be propegated up to the parent component, as its property setter will not be called in that situation. –  Remy Lebeau Feb 6 '12 at 22:16
1  
A slightly hacky alternative is to have a pointer property, with a getter that returns @FSomeRecord. The lifetime of FSomeRecord is still controlled by TMyObject, so there is no problem with memory management. –  Gerry Coll Feb 7 '12 at 5:33
1  
@Gerry that is equivalent to exposing the record as a public field –  David Heffernan Feb 7 '12 at 7:17

Ultimately you will want to access the record's fields, yet as you propose, a record is often a suitable abstraction choice within a class. A class can neatly access the properties of a record as follows:

type
  TMyRec = record
    SomeRecInteger: integer;
    SomeRecString: string;
  end;

  TMyClass = class(TObject)
  private
    FMyRec: TMyRec;
    procedure SetSomeString(const AString: string);
  public
    property SomeInteger: integer read FMyRec.SomeRecInteger write FMyRec.SomeRecInteger;
    property SomeString: string read FMyRec.SomeRecString write SetSomeString;
  end;

procedure TMyClass.SetSomeRecString(const AString: string);
begin
  If AString <> SomeString then
  begin
    // do something special if SomeRecString property is set
    FMyRec.SomeRecString := AString;
  end;
end;

Note:

  1. The direct access to the record property SomeRecInteger
  2. The use of SetSomeRecString to implement some special processing on this field only.

Hope this helps.

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+1 For convenience I would also add a procedure that takes a TMyRec parameter so I could set all values in one go. –  Marjan Venema Feb 6 '12 at 9:00
1  
+1 Not quite what what I was looking for, but taught me something new: I never knew you could use a record's fields as the property getters/setters. –  Jerry Dodge Feb 6 '12 at 9:04

Why not make the setter/getter part of the record?

TMyRecord = record
  fFirstname: string;
  procedure SetFirstName(AValue: String);
property
  Firstname : string read fFirstname write SetFirstName;
end;

TMyClass = class(TObject)
  MyRecord : TMyRecord;
end;

procedure TMyRecord.SetFirstName(AValue: String);
begin
  // do extra checking here
  fFirstname := AValue;
end;

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  MyClass: TMyClass;
begin
  MyClass := TMyClass.Create;
  try
    MyClass.MyRecord.Firstname := 'John';
    showmessage(MyClass.MyRecord.Firstname);
  finally
    MyClass.Free;
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
Woah, wait, you can do that?! That twists every knowledge I've ever had of records! –  Jerry Dodge Feb 6 '12 at 16:02
    
Yeah, it was added to the newer compilers, not sure which version it started with (I'm using 2010).. –  John Easley Feb 6 '12 at 16:13
    
The property setters here are useless. What you really did here was expose the record as a public member rather than a property. That's the big change. –  David Heffernan Aug 29 '14 at 19:12
    
@DavidHeffernan the op's example did the same, did it not? –  John Easley Nov 7 '14 at 22:47
    
@John No it did not –  David Heffernan Nov 7 '14 at 22:52

How about using a TObject instead of a Record?

type
  TMyProperties = class(TObject)
    SomeField: Integer;
  end;

  TMyObject = class(TObject)
  private
    FMyProperties: TMyProperties;     
  public
    constructor Create;
    destructor Destroy; override;

    property MyProperties: TMyRecord read FMyProperties;
  end;

implementation

constructor TMyObject.Create;
begin
  FMyProperties := TMyProperties.Create;
end;

destructor TMyObject.Destroy;
begin
  FMyProperties.Free;
end;

You can now read and set the properties of TMyProperties like this:

MyObject.MyProperties.SomeField := 1;
x := MyObject.MyProperties.SomeField;

Using this method, you don't need to individually get/set the values to/from the record. If you need to catch changes in FMyProperties, you can add a 'set' procedure in the property declaration.

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, I quite often do use objects (and persistents) for this. It also consists usually of something you don't have: an OnChange event. Essentially, my whole point is to be able to catch the changes of this record (or object) in the SetSomeRecord procedure. I was looking to see if I could encapsulate the same in a record instead, without needing an OnChange event. –  Jerry Dodge Feb 6 '12 at 9:02

You're passing the record by value, so a copy of the record is stored by the object. From that point on there are effectively two objects; the original one and the copy held by the object. Changing one won't change the other.

You need to pass the record by reference.

type
  TMyRecord = record
    SomeField: Integer;
  end;
  PMyRecord = ^TMyRecord;

  TMyObject = class(TObject)
  private
    FSomeRecord: PMyRecord;
    procedure SetSomeRecord(const Value: PMyRecord);
  public
    property SomeRecord: PMyRecord read FSomeRecord write SetSomeRecord;
  end;
share|improve this answer
5  
This makes the class very awkward to use because you force the class's clients to allocate the record and make sure its lifetime tracks that of the object. Surely you meant to store the record in the class and expose a read-only pointer property that is implemented with a getter function. Implemented as Result := @FSomeRecord where FSomeRecord is TMyRecord. –  David Heffernan Feb 6 '12 at 8:04
    
And if you are going to do that it's essentially equivalent to declaring the record as a public field of the class and you may as well do that because it makes it easier to understand. –  David Heffernan Feb 6 '12 at 8:07
    
@DavidHeffernan Agreed, that just introduces more difficulties. –  Jerry Dodge Feb 6 '12 at 9:11

this is an alternative to @SourceMaid's answer.

You could use a record (not a pointer to a record) inside your object and have a read only property which returns a pointer to your record.

the class:

type
  TMyRecord = record
    I:Integer;
  end;
  PMyRecord = ^TMyRecord;
  TMyObject = class
  private
    FMyRecord:TMyRecord;
  function GetMyRecordPointer: PMyRecord;
  public
    property MyRecord: PMyRecord read GetMyRecordPointer;
  end;

the getter:

function TMyObject.GetMyRecordPointer: PMyRecord;
begin
  result := @FMyRecord;
end;

usage:

o := TMyObject.Create;
o.MyRecord.I := 42;
ShowMessage(o.MyRecord.I.ToString);
o.MyRecord.I := 23;
ShowMessage(o.MyRecord.I.ToString);
o.Free;

you dont need a setter because you get a reference and work with. that mean that you cannot change the entire record by assigning a new one.
but you can manipulate the elements of the record directly without getting the error "Left side cannot be assigned to".

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