Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have byte array

byte[] PixelData = {255,235};

I want to convert it to short and before that I want to get the first 13 bit before the conversion because when I convert using the following code improper values return

short val1 = 0;
val1 = BitConverter.ToInt16(PixelData, 0);

any ideas how to do that

share|improve this question
    
what number do you want {255,235} with 13 bits to be? what is the desired result? there are a number of ways of interpreting that data - big/little endian? 13 msb/lsb? etc –  Marc Gravell Feb 6 '12 at 7:34

1 Answer 1

Most likely this is an endianness issue. If unsure, use shifting instead:

short val1 = (short) ((PixelData[0] << 8) | (PixelData[1]));

if you really need the 13 bits, use an & mask:

short val1 = (short) (((PixelData[0] << 8) | (PixelData[1])) & 8191);

Note: I've assumed big-endian in the above; if your data is little-endian, just reverse them:

short val1 = (short) ((PixelData[0]) | (PixelData[1] << 8));

and

short val1 = (short) (((PixelData[0]) | (PixelData[1] << 8)) & 8191);
share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot, what 8191 means please –  AMH Feb 6 '12 at 7:37
1  
@AMH 8191 is the decimal representation of the binary "1111111111111" (i.e. 13 x "1"), which restricts the answer to the 13 least significant bits –  Marc Gravell Feb 6 '12 at 7:38
    
I will give it a try –  AMH Feb 6 '12 at 7:41
    
@AMH if you had mentioned what you expect {255,235} to result in, I could be more specific –  Marc Gravell Feb 6 '12 at 7:42
    
for array {0,28} the short val1 = (short) (((PixelData[0] << 8) | (PixelData[1])) & 8191); is 28, any idea –  AMH Feb 6 '12 at 7:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.