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I'm getting an issue with MySQL for a seeming simple addition of a foreign key. I asked Google, but to no avail. Here goes:

Create first table with:

| users | CREATE TABLE `users` (
  `username` varchar(32) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  `firstname` varchar(128) DEFAULT NULL,
  `lastname` varchar(128) DEFAULT NULL,
  `password` varchar(32) DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`username`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 |

Create second table with:

| contacts | CREATE TABLE `contacts` (
  `username` varchar(32) DEFAULT NULL,
  `name` varchar(128) DEFAULT NULL,
  `phonenumber` varchar(32) DEFAULT NULL,
  `address` varchar(128) DEFAULT NULL
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 |

Now I need to add a foreign key which links 'contacts' with 'users'.

ALTER TABLE contacts ADD FOREIGN KEY (username) references USERS(username));

But I get this error: ERROR 1064 (42000): You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near ')' at line 1

The objective is obviously to ensure that all entries in 'contacts' have a corresponding 'username' entry in 'users'.

Environment: Ubuntu 11.04, MySQL 5.1.58

I must be making a stupid mistake somewhere. Suggestions welcome.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

First, change the engine of these 2 table from MyISAM to InnoDB. MyISAM does not support FOREIGN KEY constraints:

ALTER TABLE users
ENGINE = InnoDB ;

ALTER TABLE contacts
ENGINE = InnoDB ;

Then add the FOREIGN KEY, removing the extra parenthesis. There are 2 ways to do this. With the code you had, that will automatically add an index (key) on column username:

ALTER TABLE contacts 
  ADD FOREIGN KEY (username) 
    REFERENCES users(username);

Or explictedly adding the Index (Key) yourself and the Foreign Key constraint (you also choose the names of the index and constraint yourself):

ALTER TABLE contacts 
  ADD KEY username_ie (username),
  ADD CONSTRAINT users_contacts_fk
    FOREIGN KEY (username) 
    REFERENCES users(username);
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This turned out to be the actual solution. Thank you ypercube. –  sphere4a Feb 6 '12 at 7:57
    
The solution: MyISAM does not support foreign keys. Made that InnoDB. Also, there were 2 syntax errors in the above ALTER table statement. It should read: ALTER TABLE contacts ADD CONSTRAINT FOREIGN KEY (username) references users(username); Watch for braces and lower-case table name. Problem solved. Thanks guys. Love this stackoverflow. –  sphere4a Feb 6 '12 at 8:02
    
@sphere74: Table names case-sensitivity (or not) depends on installation settings: Identifier Case Sensitivity –  ypercube Feb 6 '12 at 8:09
    
Thanks ypercube. I was totally wondering... about how MySQL was being case sensitive when SQL-99 is specified to not be case sensitive. –  sphere4a Feb 7 '12 at 13:19
    
How various DBMSs treat case sensitivity on identifiers: Database identifiers, quoting and case sensitivity –  ypercube Feb 7 '12 at 13:27
ALTER TABLE contacts ADD FOREIGN KEY (username) references USERS(username));

You have an extra parenthesis at end of the line.

should be

ALTER TABLE contacts ADD CONSTRAINT FOREIGN KEY (username) references USERS(username);
share|improve this answer
    
Super... Good catch... Thank you Sathya –  sphere4a Feb 6 '12 at 7:57

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