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I have this try block in my code:

try:
    do_something_that_might_raise_an_exception()
except ValueError as err:
    errmsg = 'My custom error message.'
    raise ValueError(errmsg)

Strictly speaking, I am actually raising another ValueError, not the ValueError thrown by do_something...(), which is referred to as err in this case. How do I attach a custom message to err? I try the following code but fails due to err, a ValueError instance, not being callable:

try:
    do_something_that_might_raise_an_exception()
except ValueError as err:
    errmsg = 'My custom error message.'
    raise err(errmsg)
share|improve this question
    
Don't have an answer, but curious why? –  Hamish Feb 6 '12 at 8:14
4  
@Hamish, attaching additional information and re-raising exceptions can be very helpful when debugging. –  Johan Lundberg Feb 6 '12 at 9:39
    
@Johan Absolutely - and that's what a stacktrace is for. Can't quite understand why you'd edit the existing error message instead of raising a new error. –  Hamish Feb 6 '12 at 21:18
    
@Hamish. Sure but you can add other stuff. For your question, have a look at my answer and the example of UnicodeDecodeError. If you have comments on that perhaps comment my answer instead. –  Johan Lundberg Feb 6 '12 at 21:24

7 Answers 7

up vote 28 down vote accepted

To attach a message to the current exception and re-raise it: (the outer try/except is just to show the effect)

For python 2.x where x>=6:

try:
    try:
      raise ValueError;  # something bad...
    except ValueError as err:
      err.message=err.message+" hello"
      raise              # re-raise current exception
except ValueError as e:
    print(" got error of type "+ str(type(e))+" with message " +e.message)

This will also do the right thing if err is derived from ValueError. For example UnicodeDecodeError.

Note that you can add whatever you like to err. For example err.problematic_array=[1,2,3].


Edit: @Ducan points in a comment the above does not work with python 3 since .message is not a member of ValueError. Instead you could use this (valid python 2.6 or later or 3.x):

try:
    try:
      raise ValueError;
    except ValueError as err:
       if not err.args: 
           err.args=('',)
       err.args = err.args + ("hello",)
       raise 
except ValueError as e:
    print(" error was "+ str(type(e))+str(e.args))

Edit2:

Depending on what the purpose is, you can also opt for adding the extra information under your own variable name. For both python2 and python3:

try:
    try:
      raise ValueError;
    except ValueError as err:
       err.extra_info = "hello"
       raise 
except ValueError as e:
    print(" error was "+ str(type(e))+str(e))
    if 'extra_info' in dir(e):
       print e.extra_info
share|improve this answer
4  
Since you've gone to the effort of using Python 3 style exception handling and print, you should probably note that your code doesn't work in Python 3.x as there is no message attribute on exceptions. err.args = (err.args[0] + " hello",) + err.args[1:] may work more reliably (and then just convert to a string to get the message). –  Duncan Feb 6 '12 at 9:50
    
The answer is now updated addressing both python>=2.6 and python 3. –  Johan Lundberg Feb 7 '12 at 10:16
    
Unfortunately there's no guarantee that args[0] is a string type representing an error message - "The tuple of arguments given to the exception constructor. Some built-in exceptions (like IOError) expect a certain number of arguments and assign a special meaning to the elements of this tuple, while others are usually called only with a single string giving an error message.". So the code won't work arg[0] is not an error message (it could be an int, or it could be a string representing a file name). –  Taras Nov 1 '13 at 5:29
1  
@Taras, Interesting. Do you have a reference on that? Then I would add to a completely new member: err.my_own_extra_info. Or encapsulate it all in my own exception keeping the new and the original information. –  Johan Lundberg Nov 1 '13 at 8:20
    
@JohanLundberg, the quoted section comes from the Python docs - docs.python.org/2/library/exceptions.html. –  Taras Nov 5 '13 at 22:48
try:
    try:
        int('a')
    except ValueError, e:
        raise ValueError('There is a problem: {0}'.format(e))
except ValueError, err:
    print err

prints:

There is a problem: invalid literal for int() with base 10: 'a'
share|improve this answer
    
I was wondering if there was a Python idiom for what I'm trying to do, other than raising another instance. –  Kit Feb 6 '12 at 8:20
    
@Kit - I would call it 're-raising an exception': docs.python.org/reference/simple_stmts.html#raise –  eumiro Feb 6 '12 at 8:24
    
@eumiro, No you are making a new exception. See my answer. From your link: "... but raise with no expressions should be preferred if the exception to be re-raised was the most recently active exception in the current scope." –  Johan Lundberg Feb 6 '12 at 8:39
2  
@JohanLundberg - raise without parameters is re-raising. If OP wants to add a message, he has to raise a new exception and can re-use the message/type of the original exception. –  eumiro Feb 6 '12 at 8:47
1  
If you want to add a message you can not create a new message from scratch by throwing "ValueError". By doing so, you destroy the underlying information of what kind of ValueError it is (similar to slicing in C++). By re-throwing the same exception with raise without an argument, you pass the original object with that correct specific type (derived from ValueError). –  Johan Lundberg Mar 24 at 18:27

It seems all the answers are adding info to e.args[0], thereby altering the existing error message. Is there a downside to extending the args tuple instead? I think the possible upside is, you can leave the original error message alone for cases where parsing that string is needed; and you could add multiple elements to the tuple if your custom error handling produced several messages or error codes, for cases where the traceback would be parsed programmatically (like via a system monitoring tool).

## Approach #1, if the exception may not be derived from Exception and well-behaved:

def to_int(x):
    try:
        return int(x)
    except Exception, e:
        e.args = (e.args if e.args else tuple()) + ('Custom message',)
        raise

>>> to_int('12')
12

>>> to_int('12 monkeys')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 3, in to_int
ValueError: ("invalid literal for int() with base 10: '12 monkeys'", 'Custom message')

or

## Approach #2, if the exception is always derived from Exception and well-behaved:

def to_int(x):
    try:
        return int(x)
    except Exception, e:
        e.args += ('Custom message',)
        raise

>>> to_int('12')
12

>>> to_int('12 monkeys')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 3, in to_int
ValueError: ("invalid literal for int() with base 10: '12 monkeys'", 'Custom message')

Can you see a downside to this approach?

share|improve this answer
    
My older answer does not alter e.args[0]. –  Johan Lundberg Oct 27 '13 at 11:31

I realize this question has been around for awhile, but once you're lucky enough to only support python 3.x, this really becomes a thing of beauty :)

raise from

We can chain the exceptions using raise from.

try:
    1 / 0
except ZeroDivisionError as e:
    raise Exception('Smelly socks') from e

In this case, the exception your caller would catch has the line number of the place where we raise our exception.

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 2, in <module>
    1 / 0
ZeroDivisionError: division by zero

The above exception was the direct cause of the following exception:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 4, in <module>
    raise Exception('Smelly socks') from e
Exception: Smelly socks

Notice the bottom exception only has the stacktrace from where we raised our exception. Your caller could still get the original exception by accessing the __cause__ attribute of the exception they catch.

with_traceback

Or you can use with_traceback.

try:
    1 / 0
except ZeroDivisionError as e:
    raise Exception('Smelly socks').with_traceback(e.__traceback__)

Using this form, the exception your caller would catch has the traceback from where the original error occurred.

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 2, in <module>
    1 / 0
ZeroDivisionError: division by zero

During handling of the above exception, another exception occurred:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 4, in <module>
    raise Exception('Smelly socks').with_traceback(e.__traceback__)
  File "test.py", line 2, in <module>
    1 / 0
Exception: Smelly socks

Notice the bottom exception has the line where we performed the invalid division as well as the line where we reraise the exception.

share|improve this answer

The current answer did not work good for me, if the exception is not re-caught the appended message is not shown.

But doing like below both keeps the trace and shows the appended message regardless if the exception is re-caught or not.

try:
  raise ValueError("Original message")
except ValueError as err:
  t, v, tb = sys.exc_info()
  raise t, ValueError(err.message + " Appended Info"), tb

( I used Python 2.7, have not tried it in Python 3 )

share|improve this answer

if you want to custom the error type, a simple thing you can do is to define an error class based on ValueError.

share|improve this answer
    
how would that help in this case? –  Johan Lundberg Feb 6 '12 at 9:09

This code template should allow you to raise an exception with a custom message.

try:
     raise ValueError
except ValueError as err:
    raise type(err)("my message")
share|improve this answer
2  
This does not preserve the stack trace. –  plok May 9 '14 at 11:31

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