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I was reading some sourcecode from Java libraries, and I am confused here;

This code is from Document.java in jaxb library, and ContentVisitor is an Interface in same package, how can we create an instance of Interface with a new keyword? isn't that illegal?

public final class Document {
.
.
 private final ContentVisitor visitor = new ContentVisitor() {
    public void onStartDocument() {

        throw new IllegalStateException();
    }

    public void onEndDocument() {
        out.endDocument();
    }

    public void onEndTag() {
        out.endTag();
        inscopeNamespace.popContext();
        activeNamespaces = null;
    }
}
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9  
You have just discovered, probably, one of the most powerful features of Java Programming Language. –  Mersenne Feb 6 '12 at 9:15

8 Answers 8

up vote 20 down vote accepted

In the code, you're not creating an instance of the interface. Rather, the code defines an anonymous class that implements the interface, and instantiates that class.

The code is roughly equivalent to:

public final class Document {

    private final class AnonymousContentVisitor implements ContentVisitor {

        public void onStartDocument() {
            throw new IllegalStateException();
        }

        public void onEndDocument() {
            out.endDocument();
        }

        public void onEndTag() {
            out.endTag();
            inscopeNamespace.popContext();
            activeNamespaces = null;
        }
    }

    private final ContentVisitor visitor = new AnonymousContentVisitor();
}
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thanks does this syntax(anonymous class) only saves us from writing some extra code or it has other advantages or uses too? –  user893334 Feb 6 '12 at 9:18
    
It saves having to write extra code and coming up with a name. The name is more likely to be Document$1 in the above example. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 6 '12 at 9:20
    
@DesignCode: It's mainly syntactic sugar, but does have unique selling points as well. For example, if such a class is defined inside a function, it can access final variables defined inside the function. –  NPE Feb 6 '12 at 9:21

It's valid. It's called Anonymous class. See here

We've already seen examples of the syntax for defining and instantiating an anonymous class. We can express that syntax more formally as:

new class-name ( [ argument-list ] ) { class-body }

or:

new interface-name () { class-body }
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+1 tnx nice link –  user893334 Feb 6 '12 at 9:32

It is called anonymous type/class which implements that interface. Take a look at tutorial - Local and Anonymous Inner Classes.

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That declaration actually creates a new anonymous class which implements the ContentVisitor interface and then its instance for that given scope and is perfectly valid.

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There's something called anonymous class in java http://www.java2s.com/Code/Java/Class/Anonymous-class.htm

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Do notice where the braces open - you are declaring an inner object (called anonymous class) that implements ContentVisitor and all required methods on the spot!

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It is inline interface implementation.Here the idea is to have the compiler generate an anonymous class that implements the interface. Then for each method defined in the interface you can (optionally) provide a method with a suitable signature that will be used as the implementation of the interface's method.

It is the new Oxygene syntax, added to the language to allow Oxygene programmers to work with these interface-based events in much the same way as Java programmers do.

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You actually have just provided the implementation of this interface in an anonymous way. This is quite common and of course possible. Have a look here for more information.

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