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I have the following class:

public class DocumentCompare
{
    public string Customer;
    public string Filename;
    public string Reference;
    public DateTime? Date;

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if (obj == null)
            return false;

        DocumentCompare doc = obj as DocumentCompare;
        if ((Object)doc == null)
            return false;

        return (doc.Customer == Customer) && (doc.Date == Date) && (doc.Filename == Filename) && (doc.Reference == Reference);
    }

    public bool Equals(DocumentCompare doc)
    {
        if ((object)doc == null)
            return false;

        return (doc.Customer == Customer) && (doc.Date == Date) && (doc.Filename == Filename) && (doc.Reference == Reference);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return string.Format("{0}_{1}_{2}_{3}",Customer,Filename,Reference,(Date == null ? "" : Date.Value.ToString())).GetHashCode();
    }
}

I will be retrieving 2 lists of this class - what I want to do is to compare the two, and get ones that don't exist in both. So if an item exists in x list but not in y, I want to perform an action for the items in this list. If an item exists in y list but not in x, I want to do a different action.

How would I do this? Using LINQ I guess!

EDIT: Performance is not much of an issue - this will only be run once

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It sounds like you just want Except:

foreach (var newItem in firstList.Except(secondList))
{
    ...
}

As an aside:

  • That's not a terribly nice way of generating a hash code - search for other questions here.
  • Delegate from Equals(object) to Equals(DocumentCompare) to avoid repetitive logic
  • Mutable types aren't great candidates for equality comparisons (in particular, one you've used a value as a key in a dictionary, if you change the equality-sensitive components you won't be able to find the key again)
  • Even if you do want it to be mutable, properties are better for encapsulation than public fields
  • I would either seal the type or check whether the two objects are exactly the same type, as otherwise you could end up with asymmetric equality
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+1 Strongly agree with aside 3: usually best to leave the default reference equality, or introduce a surrogate key and compare by that if you absolutely must –  MattDavey Feb 6 '12 at 9:44
1  
Thanks - I know it's not the best solution but this will only be run once –  Chris Feb 7 '12 at 8:29

here is the code:

var elementsMissingFromFirstList = firstList.Except(secondList).ToList();
var elementsMissingInSecondList  = secondList.Except(firstList).ToList();

now you can perform your actions on these missing elements :)

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You can use this method to compare objects of two different Lists. exmp: List and List x and y = DocumentCompare,

  public static bool EqualsObject<T>(this T t1, T t2) where T : class
        {
            var p1 = t1.GetType().Fields();
            var p2 = t2.GetType().Fields();
            for (int j = 0; j < p1.Length; j++)
            {
                var x = p1[j].GetValue(t1, null);
                var y = p2[j].GetValue(t2, null);
                if (x == null && y == null)
                    continue;
                if (x != null && y == null)
                    return false;
                if (x == null)
                    return false;
                if (!x.Equals(y))
                {
                    return false;
                }
            }
            return true;
        }

This method will show the difference between these two lists.

    public static List<T> DifferentObjects<T>(List<T> t, List<T> t2) where T : class
    {
        var diff = new List<T>();
        if (t != null && t2 != null)
        {
            foreach (T t1 in t)
            {
                var state = false;
                foreach (T t3 in t2.Where(t3 => EqualsObject(t1,t3)))
                {
                    state = true;
                }
                if (!state)
                {
                    diff.Add(t1);
                }
            }
        }
        return diff;
    }

you can use code this way

        var t = new List<DocumentCompare>();
        var t2 = new List<DocumentCompare>();

        t.Add(new DocumentCompare{Customer = "x"});
        t.Add(new DocumentCompare{Customer = "y"});
        t.Add(new DocumentCompare{Customer = "z"});

        t2.Add(new DocumentCompare { Customer = "t" });
        t2.Add(new DocumentCompare { Customer = "y" });
        t2.Add(new DocumentCompare { Customer = "z" });

        var list = DifferentObjects(t, t2);
        var list2 = DifferentObjects(t2, t);

you used fields (Customer,FileName etc..) in your class, so that GetType().Fields(); is used in EqualsObject method. if you use property , you should use GetType().Properties(); in EqualsObject method.

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