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Let's say I have an interface ICustomerService and this interface requires an enum, e.g. ProcessingMode:

namespace MyServices {
    public enum ProcessingMode { Immediate, Normal, Slow }

    public interface ICustomerService {
        void Process(ProcessingMode mode);
    }
}

The enum can't be defined inside the interface in C# (but apparently in VB?). But having it outside the interface clutters the containing namespace MyServices. Not good, since other interfaces might also require a different enum called ProcessingMode.

So are there any "best practices" how to solve this?

I can see a few options, but none of them seems quite right to me:

  1. Put both the interface and the enum in a service-specific namespace:

    namespace MyServices.CustomerService {
        public enum ProcessingMode { Immediate, Normal, Slow }
    
        public interface ICustomerService {
            void Process(ProcessingMode mode);
        }
    }
    

    While it works and avoids clutter in the containing namespace, it does cause namespace proliferation, and I guess a service implementation might clash with the namespace or duplicate it: MyNamespace.CustomerService.CustomerService. Or where would you put the service implementation and what would you call it?

  2. Put just the enum in a separate namespace (or a static class):

    namespace MyServices {
        namespace CustomerServiceTypes {
            public enum ProcessingMode { Immediate, Normal, Slow }
        }
    
        public interface ICustomerService {
            void Process(CustomerServiceTypes.ProcessingMode mode);
        }
    }
    

    Same problems as option 1 but also requires a enum name to be qualified "everywhere".

  3. Prefix the enum name, e.g. CustomerServiceProcessingMode. Avoids namespace proliferation and risk of name clashes with service implementations, but causes long ugly enum names.

So how would you do it?

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It is not clear to me what problem you are trying to solve here. Why do you think exposing the enum in your main namespace is a problem? –  Oded Feb 6 '12 at 10:22
    
@Oded: The name of the enum could be made short and distinct within the naming scope (namespace) of the interface, e.g. CustomerService.ProcessingMode, but outside the interface, in a mor generic namespace where potentially dozens of servie interfaces reside, the enum name has to be a lot longer and more precise, essentially repeating the service name, e.g. CustomerProcessingMode. I would have liked to avoid that. –  Kjell Rilbe Feb 6 '12 at 12:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just because it is the customer service that does the processing doesn't mean you have to name the enum "CustomerService....." - if the enum is for the Customer then just call it CustomerProcessingMode; especially if the enum is going to be a property on the business class.

If there will be many ways of processing the customer which will require different processing modes then you will have to use the name of the service instead, but the reason you don't like the look of the name is because your service name is rubbish :) "CustomerService" - what does that do exactly?

MailingService (which runs on implementers of an interface) would be a good example for a service, because the name tells you what the service does, NOT what it works on. Even "CustomerRepository" is a good name because the name tells you what it does.

  1. Use the namespace MyModel.Services
  2. Use a name for your service which explains what it does rather than what it works on
  3. Then you end up with a nice descriptive (and unique) enum name like "MailingPriority" instead

Naming services "CustomerService" has no indication of the task of the service, and usually end up performing anything and everything to do with customers - kind of a "Swiss Army Knife" service which should really have a single focussed task rather than be a catalogue of everything one can do with a customer.

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Good thoughts. The names I wrote were just for example, and I didn't think of the aspects you bring up here. The real case (in Swedish and more comlex) has better names. I still feel it would be nice to be able to define an enum inside the service interface, when the enum is tightly coupled with the interface contract. –  Kjell Rilbe Feb 6 '12 at 11:32
    
@KjellRilbe - but you can't do that, so what are you going to do? :) –  Peter Morris Feb 6 '12 at 11:45

Simply put interface and enum under one namespace. In any case you will have to make the enum public, because you are using it inside service. So by putting interface and enum under one namespace, makes the implementer of interface to include only one namespace.

Like System.Drawing has Color enum.

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Yes, fine, but assuming you have 150+ service interfaces, you get rather a lot of namespaces if you create a new one for each service. Not that I would expect any problems re. performance, size of binaries or anything, but it just seems like rather a lot... –  Kjell Rilbe Feb 6 '12 at 10:45
    
@KjellRilbe: If you are working with 150+ service interface, in that case my friend either you are seating on gold mine (so huge project, big bucks) and can afford to mess up or there is some serious problem in the architecture. :) Secondly seperation of service is very definite, logically you shouldn't be using contracts from one service to another. –  Amar Palsapure Feb 6 '12 at 10:53
    
@@Amar: Yes, right, I don't have 150 services. But I can see that there will possibly be a lot of services in the system I'm working with. I guess whichever way I do it, the enums have to be qualified "somehow", and a common namespace for enum and service interface is probably the best approach. I do wish that C# would support member types in interfaces though. I think it's reasonable, the types being part of the interface contract. –  Kjell Rilbe Feb 6 '12 at 11:20

I would probably use the combination of two:

  • Put both the interface and the enum in a service-specific namespace.
  • Have more specific name for the enum (if appropriate).

I would not be worried to much about clashing names, your enum name is a part of your service contract, just as the interface name. You don't really worry about someone defining the same interface in the same namespace, do you? Same for enum and other public types that are part of the contract.

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I would opt for #3. Names should be descriptive and at first glance show what they're for. Length of the name is no criterium for me. I would find it much more irritating to have multiple ProcessingMode enums with different meanings.

Just my 2cent...

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