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Is there any way of being notified when something subscribes to an event in my class, or do I need to wrap subscription/unsubsription in methods eg:

public class MyClass : ISomeInterface
{
     public event SomeEventHandler SomeEvent; //How do I know when something subscribes?

     private void OnSomeEventSubscription(SomeEventHandler handler)
     { 
          //do some work
     }

     private void OnSomeEventUnsubscription(SomeEventHandler handler)
     { 
          //do some work
     }
}

instead of

public class MyClass : ISomeInterface
{
     private SomeEventHandler _someEvent;

     public void SubscribeToSomeEvent(SomeEventHandler handler)
     {
          _someEvent += handler;

          //do some work
     }

     public void UnsubscribeFromSomeEvent(SomeEventHandler handler)
     {
          _someEvent -= handler;

          //do some work
     }    
}

The reason I ask is because the event is already exposed directly on a ISomeInterface but this particular implementation needs to know when stuff subscribes/unsubscribes.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can write custom accessors for your event:

private SomeEventHandler _someEvent;
public event SomeEventHandler SomeEvent
{
    add
    {
        _someEvent += value;
        Console.WriteLine("Someone subscribed to SomeEvent");
    }
    remove
    {
        _someEvent -= value;
        Console.WriteLine("Someone unsubscribed from SomeEvent");
    }
}
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1  
Note that with this code event subscription isn't threadsafe. An easy way to achieve that is marking _someEvent as event too. –  CodesInChaos Feb 6 '12 at 10:41
    
Brilliant, thanks! –  GazTheDestroyer Feb 6 '12 at 10:45

Thomas has answered this already but thought I'd also add that you may need to lock any critical section in the add remove sections since event subscription is never thread safe, i.e. you have no idea who is going to connect to you or when. E.g.:

    private readonly object _objectLock = new object(); 
    private SomeEventHandler _someEvent; 

    public event SomeEventHandler SomeEvent
    {
        add
        {      
            lock(_objectLock)
            {
                _someEvent += value;
                // do critical processing here, e.g. increment count, etc could also use Interlocked class.
            } // End if
        } // End of class
        remove
        {
            lock(_objectLock)
            {
                 _someEvent -= value;
                // do critical processing here, e.g. increment count, etc could also use Interlocked class.
            } // End if
        } // End if
    } // End of event
share|improve this answer
    
You forgot to include _someEvent. If it's just a field, your code isn't thread safe either. –  CodesInChaos Feb 6 '12 at 11:51
    
Yes you're right - C# 4.0 gives you an implicit lock if you declare _someEvent as a field-like event, so if it was "private event SomeEventHandler _someEvent", then the lock inside the add/remove for adding/removing the value is not required. –  Jeb Feb 7 '12 at 10:02

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