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I have a few places in my code where I have nested objects, but can't guarantee they will always be set.

This could give me an ruby undefined method for nil:NilClass

puts obj1.obj2.obj3.obj4.to_s

This check is ugly and repetitive:

if(obj1 && obj1.obj2 && obj1.obj2.obj3 && obj1.obj2.obj3.obj4)
  puts obj1.obj2.obj3.obj4.to_s
end

Is there a concise way to write, if anything is nil just silently fail?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

My version of try:

class Object
  def try(*args, &block)
    if args.empty? and block_given?
      begin
        instance_eval &block
      rescue NameError => e
        puts e.message + ' ' + e.backtrace.first
      end
    elsif respond_to?(args.first)
      send(*args, &block)
    end
  end
end

So then instead of this long expression:

obj1.try(:obj2).try(:obj3).try(:obj4).to_s

you can do this:

obj1.try{ obj2.obj3.obj4.to_s }

UPDATE: Made it a little cleaner

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I like this! I'd actually like to see this packaged up similar to andand (and possibly renamed, e.g. obj1.maybe { obj2.obj3.obj4.to_s }. –  Michael Kohl Feb 6 '12 at 11:57
    
Thanks, nice hint, i'll do the gem –  megas Feb 6 '12 at 13:00
    
I have written a gem which helps with this nicely - github.com/pzol/monadic so you can do Maybe(obj1).obj2.obj3.fetch('default') - where you can also provide a default if something on the way is nil. See also the Validation monad –  Piotr Zolnierek May 3 '12 at 3:53

Or use andand. I prefer this over symbols and find it more natural.

obj1.andand.obj2.andand.obj3.andand.obj4
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Yep nice library ;) –  lucapette Feb 6 '12 at 11:23

Use try. It's not from the Ruby library but you could easily add it to your project. So you'll be able to do:

obj1.try(:obj2).try(:obj3).try(:obj4)
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Try is defined in ActiveSupport. You get it for free with Rails, otherwise you can just include it via require "activesupport". –  Mark Thomas Feb 6 '12 at 12:30
    
Requiring the entire ActiveSupport library just for try seems a little overkill, and potentially dangerous. (ActiveSupport's monkeypatching has broken things for me in the past.) If you're going to use just this, I would require "active_support/core_ext/object/try" –  Phrogz Feb 6 '12 at 13:55

Aside from the try approach mentioned by lucapette you could also wrap that code in begin; rescue; end and just rescue NameError:

begin
    if(obj1 && obj1.obj2 && obj1.obj2.obj3 && obj1.obj2.obj3.obj4)
        puts obj1.obj2.obj3.obj4.to_s
    end
rescue NameError
end

You can see the difference on this code:

#!/usr/bin/ruby

p :not_defined

begin
    if(obj1 && obj1.obj2 && obj1.obj2.obj3 && obj1.obj2.obj3.obj4)
        puts obj1.obj2.obj3.obj4.to_s
    end
rescue NameError
    p :ouch
end

p :defined_all_the_way

class Yup
    def method_missing(m, *a, &b)
        self
    end

    def to_s
        :yup
    end
end
obj1 = Yup.new

begin
    if(obj1 && obj1.obj2 && obj1.obj2.obj3 && obj1.obj2.obj3.obj4)
        puts obj1.obj2.obj3.obj4.to_s
    end
rescue NameError
    p :ouch
end

__END__
Results in:
:not_defined
:ouch
:defined_all_the_way
yup
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Note that if high-speed performance is important, using Exceptions like this can be very slow. Also note that some believe that Exceptions should not be Expected. –  Phrogz Feb 6 '12 at 13:59
1  
When are going to (ab)use Exceptions like this you can also make your code a hair simpler by using the form s = foo.bar.baz.to_s rescue nil; –  Phrogz Feb 6 '12 at 14:07
1  
@Phrogz: this will silently swallow all sorts of exceptions other than NameError that one might want to know about. –  Jörg W Mittag Feb 6 '12 at 16:25

You can surely have a better design that chained checks for nil objects. The pattern known as "Maybe monad" is particulary good at this exercise. First you have to properly wrap the untyped "Something or Nil" objects into proper "Maybe" objects. Then, in your case, your would simply write :

puts obj1.bind(&:obj2).bind(&:obj3).bind(&:obj4)

This is a functional programming style. If you want to give it a try, you can start with the funkr gem which is designed for this can of usage.

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Rumonade gem is great for this github.com/ms-ati/rumonade –  ms-tg May 3 '12 at 21:01

I think a bigger issue is violation of law of Demeter here. :-) You really should reconsider reaching into so many objects at once.

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