Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I need to simulate the left join effect without using the "left join" key.

I have two tables, A and B, both with id and name columns. I would like to select all the dbids on both tables, where the name in A equals the name in B.

I use this to make a synchronization, so at the beginning B is empty (so I will have couples with id from A with a value and id from B is null). Later I will have a mix of couples with value - value and value - null.

Normally it would be:

SELECT A.id, B.id
FROM A left join B
ON A.name = B.name

The problem is that I can't use the left join and wanted to know if/how it is possible to do the same thing.

share|improve this question
1  
Why can't you use the left join? – ridecar2 Feb 6 '12 at 12:00
9  
Questions in the format "I want to do [thing] but I can't use [tool that is usually used to do [thing]]" are usually a sign that the problem is being approached in the wrong way. Please give some context around the real problem you are trying to solve, and the reason why you cannot use LEFT JOIN in your query. – Polynomial Feb 6 '12 at 12:01
5  
@Polynomial sometimes it's a sign of a homework assignment or interview question. Or maybe OP's L-key is broken. Maybe he will clarify... – Dennis Traub Feb 6 '12 at 12:19
2  
Sound like you want the relational operator semi difference (a.k.a. antijoin) but, not knowing what it is called, name-checked the SQL concept commonly used to perform it. Not being able to use a left join is potentially interesting question but begs another: "What can you use?" – onedaywhen Feb 6 '12 at 12:22
1  
@Polynomial: there are always about seven ways to do a given thing in SQL, two of which will be considered candidates and should be performance tested. SQL is not a one-size-fits-all kind of language. – onedaywhen Feb 6 '12 at 12:27
up vote 3 down vote accepted

you can use this approach, but you must be sure that the inner select only returns one row.

SELECT A.id, 
(select b.id where  A.name = B.name) as B_ID
FROM A 
share|improve this answer
    
Is it right that this solution works for all DBs (Oracle, MySql, PostGre, ...)? The one Polynomial suggested is the same as this, but it uses the NVL, which i.e MySql doesn't have... – Francesco Feb 6 '12 at 13:06
    
not sure, you would have to try. I only have access to SQL Server here – Diego Feb 6 '12 at 13:46
    
This is not equivalent to a LEFT JOIN. Or, to be accurate, it is equivalent only of B(name) has UNIQUE constraint. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Feb 19 '12 at 2:20

Just reverse the tables and use a right join instead.

SELECT A.id,
       B.id
FROM   B
       RIGHT JOIN A
         ON A.name = B.name  
share|improve this answer
21  
+1 for making me laugh. – Polynomial Feb 6 '12 at 12:06
    
makes sense, he didn't mentioned anything about right joins – Diego Feb 6 '12 at 12:15

I'm not familiar with java/jpa. Using pure SQL, here's one approach:

SELECT A.id AS A_id, B.id AS B_id
  FROM A INNER JOIN B
          ON A.name = B.name
UNION
SELECT id AS A_id, NULL AS B_id 
  FROM A 
 WHERE name NOT IN ( SELECT name FROM B );
share|improve this answer

You could use subqueries, something like:

select a.id
,      nvl((select b.id from b where b.name = a.name), "") as bId
from a
share|improve this answer

In SQL Server, for example, You can use the *= operator to make a left join:

select A.id, B.id
from A, B
where A.name *= B.name

Other databases might have a slightly different syntax, if such an operator exists at all.

This is the old syntax, used before the join keyword was introduced. You should of course use the join keyword instead if possible. The old syntax might not even work in newer versions of the database.

share|improve this answer
1  
I still see LEFT JOIN in your query. Am I missing something? – Polynomial Feb 6 '12 at 12:04
1  
*= is only for Microsoft SQL Server. Oracle uses (+). All the others don't have such an operator at all. – a_horse_with_no_name Feb 6 '12 at 12:06
    
@Polynomial: You were just too quick to read it. I corrected that right after I posted the answer. :) – Guffa Feb 6 '12 at 12:06
    
@a_horse_with_no_name: That's right, I should have mentioned that. – Guffa Feb 6 '12 at 12:07

I can only think of two ways that haven't been given so far. My last three ideas have already been given (boohoo) but I put them here for posterity. I DID think of them without cheating. :-p

  1. Calculate whether B has a match, then provide an extra UNIONed row for the B set to supply the NULL when there is no match:

    SELECT A.id, B.id
    FROM
       (
          SELECT
             A.id,
             CASE
             WHEN EXISTS (SELECT * FROM B WHERE A.id = B.id) THEN 1
             ELSE 0
             END Which
          FROM A
       ) A
       INNER JOIN (
          SELECT 0 Which, B.id FROM B
          UNION ALL SELECT 1, NULL
       ) B ON A.Which = B.Which
          AND (
             A.Which = 1
             OR (
                A.Which = 0
                AND A.id = b.id
             )
          )
    
  2. Only for SQL Server specifically. I know, it's really a left join, but it doesn't SAY LEFT in there!

    SELECT A.id, B.id
    FROM
       A
       OUTER APPLY (
          SELECT *
          FROM B
          WHERE A.id = B.id
       ) B
    
  3. Get the inner join then UNION the outer join:

    SELECT A.id, B.id
    FROM
       A
       INNER JOIN B ON A.name = B.name
    UNION ALL 
    SELECT A.id, NULL
    FROM A
    WHERE NOT EXISTS (
       SELECT *
       FROM B
       WHERE A.id = B.id
    )
    
  4. Use RIGHT JOIN. That's not a LEFT JOIN!

    SELECT A.id, B.id
    FROM
       B
       RIGHT JOIN A ON B.name = A.name
    
  5. Just select the B value in a subquery expression (let's hope there's only one B per A). Multiple columns from B can be their own expressions (YUCKO!):

    SELECT A.id, (SELECT TOP 1 B.id FROM B WHERE A.id = B.id) Bid
    FROM A
    

Anyone using Oracle may need some FROM DUAL clauses in any SELECTs that have no FROM.

share|improve this answer
SELECT A.id, B.id
FROM A full outer join B
ON A.name = B.name
where A.name is not null
share|improve this answer

you can use oracle + operator for left join :-

SELECT A.id, B.id FROM A , B ON A.name = B.name (+)

Find link :-

Oracle "(+)" Operator

share|improve this answer

I'm not sure if you just can't use a LEFT JOIN or if you're restricted from using any JOINS at all. But as far as I understand your requirements, an INNER JOIN should work:

SELECT A.id, B.id
FROM A 
INNER JOIN B ON A.name = B.name
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.