Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my understanding the strategy pattern is used to make behaviour interchangable. This involves that the responsibility of the strategy is defined in an interface, to which the client may then delegate calls. E.g. suppose a value can be obtained in different ways, the interface would have a method "getValue()".

My question concerns the case where the flow of control is opposite. For example if the concrete strategy initiates the request "onValueChanged()" on the client (suppose it has a reference to the client or a callback interface).

Is this still considered a strategy pattern?

Update - added the following source code example:

interface DataSupplierCb
{
  void onValueChanged(int a);
}

interface DataSupplier
{
  void check();
}

// NOTE 1: Data supplier knows how the get the value
class ConcreteDataSupplier : public DataSupplier
{
  void check()
  {        
    myDataSupplierCb.onValueChanged(47);
  }
}

class Client : public DataSupplierCb
{
  void onValueChanged(int a)
  {
    // NOTE 2: Client knows what to do with the value
  }

  void changeDataSupplier(int i)
  {
    if (i == 1)
    {
      myCurrentDataSupplier = new ConcreteDataSupplier(this);
    }
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
For me it looks like observer –  sll Feb 6 '12 at 16:58
    
If you code put a tiny bit more code as an example then it might help. Doesn't even have to be real code, pseudocode would suffice. –  tcarvin Feb 7 '12 at 13:09
    
Thanks for your response. I have tried to make a source code example that illustrates my case. –  Vandhunden Feb 7 '12 at 13:54
    
Thanks for posting that, it helped quite a bit! –  tcarvin Feb 8 '12 at 13:12
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If the intent of the DataSupplier interface to allow your Client to swap in, and delegate to, different concrete data-fetching implementations then yes it can be considered a strategy. Your Client is shielded from the details (aka strategy) used to fetch the value as expected in the use of the Strategy pattern. And the fact that the Client reference is passed to the Strategy is fine and common:

(From the GoF)

"Strategy and Context interact to implement the chosen algorithm. A context may pass all data required by the algorithm to the strategy when the algorithm is called. Alternatively, the context can pass itself as an argument to Strategy operations. That lets the strategy call back on the context as required."

The Context for you is Client.

Now that all being said, rare is a solution that uses only one pattern. Your notification does seem to use the Observer pattern as another poster commented, and that is fine.

What I don't like about what you have implemented though is that your Strategy is a pure interface. Not always a bad thing, but in this case, with that notification callback, an interface does not provide a guarantee that the notifictaion callback is going to happen. Interfaces only guarantee the method signatures. I would recommend using the Template pattern in a base class to derrive the strategies from.

abstract class DataSupplier
{

   protected ClientInterface _client;

   // ctor takes in context
   public DataSupplier(ClientInterface client)
   {
      _client - client;
   }

   public void check()
   {
      int priorValue = 46;

      int newValue = OnGetValue(); 

      if (priorValue != newValue)
         _client.onValueChanged(newValue)

   }

   protected abstract int OnCheck();

}

And then:

class ConcreteDataSupplier : DataSupplier
{

   // Check, and notification, are handled by the base.  We only need
   // to implement the actually data fetching

   int OnGetValue()
   {        
      return someValue;
   }
}

With this approach, I know the notification will be handled. I don't need to worry about an implementor forgetting it in a new strategy later.

share|improve this answer
    
Great answer and advice. I agree that this can be seen as a combination of different patterns. –  Vandhunden Feb 8 '12 at 18:01
add comment

No. That would not be the strategy pattern. In the strategy pattern, the strategy interface, and the concrete strategy implementations do not know about the client.

The client knows about the strategy interface, and knows nothing about the actual implementations.

The goal of this pattern is the ability of replacing one strategy with another without modifying the client. A strategy is usually some sort of algorithm.

What you are describing seems to be closer to the Observer design pattern in which there is a subject and one or several observers implementing a common interface (or inheriting from a common base class). The subject is the object that is being observerved, and the observers are objects that need to be notified whenever the subject changes. e.g: the subject can be some kind of data source, and one observer can be an histogram view, and another a pie chart view.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observer_pattern
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strategy_pattern
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.