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This is a question regarding architecture.

Let's say that I have created a layered system in ASP.NET MVC with a good domain layer which uses the repository pattern for data-access. One of those domain objects is Product. At the CMS-side I have a view for creating and editing products. And I have a front-end where that product should be shown. And these views differ considerably so that a different viewmodel for them is appropriate.

1) Where should a new Product object be created when the user enters data for a new product in the data entrance view? In the controller? But making the controller responsible for object creation could hurt the Single Responsibility principle. Or should the factory pattern be used? That would mean that the factory would be very specific, because the data entered would be passed 'as is' to the factory. So coding against an IProductFactory would not be possible, because the input data is specific to that data entrance view. So is it right that we have a tight coupling between this controller and the factory?

2) The Product viewmodel to be shown at the frontend, where should that come from? The answer seems to me a ViewModelFactory that takes the domain object Product and creates a view from it. But again, this viewmodelfactory would be specific for this view, because the viewmodel we are asking for is specific. So is it right then that the controller and the viewmodelfactory would be tightly coupled?

3) Validation: The input data should be validated at the frontend, but the domain layer should also validate the product (because the domain layer knows nothing about the UI and does not even know IF the UI does validation and thus should not depend upon validation there). but where should the validation go? The ProductFactory seems to be a good choice; it seems to me that that adheres to SRP, if the task of a product factory is described as 'creating valid product objects.' But perhaps the Product business object should contain the validation. That seems more appropriate because validation of a product will not only be needed at creation time but at other places as well. But how can we validate a Product that is not yet created? Should the Product business object then have methods like IsNameValid, IsPriceValid etc??

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1 Answer 1

I'm going to answer your second question first.

Yes, viewmodels should be tightly coupled with the controller. You shouldn't need a ViewModelFactory though. Something like AutoMapper or ValueInjecter should be good enough for converting domain Product to ProductViewModel.

As for your first question, you should keep your domain Product Factory separate from your controller. There are a few different approaches you could use. One would be creating a factory method that only takes scalar values as method arguments -- for example string, bool, etc, other primitives, and pure .NET types.

You can then have your controller pass the scalars to the factory method from the viewmodel. This is loosely coupled, and highly cohesive.

For example:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult CreateProduct(ProductViewModel model)
{
    if (ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        // assuming product factory is constructor-injected
        var domainProduct = _productFactory.BuildProduct(
            model.Name, model.Price, model.Description);
        // ... eventually return a result
    }
    return View(model);
}

Another approach is to put the methods for passing viewmodel properties directly on the domain object, but for this approach, it is best to make your property setters non-public:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult CreateProduct(ProductViewModel model)
{
    if (ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        // assuming no product factory
        var domainProduct = new Domain.Product();
        domainProduct.SetName(model.Name);
        domainProduct.SetPrice(model.Price);
        domainProduct.SetDescription(model.Description);
        // ... eventually return a result
    }
    return View(model);
}

I prefer the first option because it's less verbose, and keeps object creation in your domain layer. However both are loosely coupled, because you are not sharing viewmodel types between your MVC layer and your domain layer. Instead your higher layer (MVC) is taking a dependency in the domain layer, but your domain layer is free from all MVC concerns.

Response to first 2 comments

Second comment first, re validation: It doesn't necessarily have to be the product factory's responsibility to enforce validation, but if you want to enforce business rules in the domain, validation should happen at the factory or lower. For example, a product factory could instantiate a product and then delegate build operations to methods on the entity -- similar to the SetXyzProperty methods above (difference being those methods might be internal to the domain lib instead of public). In this case, it would be the product entity's responsibility to enforce validation on itself.

If you throw exceptions to enforce validation, those would bubble up through the factory and into the controller. This is what I generally try to do. If a business rule ever ends up bubbling to the controller, then it means MVC is missing a validation rule and ModelState.IsValid should be false. Also, this way you don't have to worry about passing messages back from the factory -- business rule violations will come in the form of an exception.

As for your first comment, yes: MVC takes a dependency on the domain, not vice versa. If you wanted to pass a viewmodel to the factory, your domain would be taking a dependency on whatever lib the viewmodel class is in (which should be MVC). It's true that you could end up with a lot of factory method args, or factory method overload explosion. If you find this happening, it might be better to expose more granular methods on the entity itself than relying on the factory.

For example, you might have a form where the user can quickly click to change just the name or price of a Product, without going through the whole form. That action could even happen over ajax using JSON instead of a full browser POST. When the controller handles it, it might be easier to just invoke myProduct.SetPriceOrName(object priceOrName) instead of productFactory.RePriceOrRename(int productId, object priceOrName).

Response to question update

Others may have different opinions, but in mine, the business domain should not expose a validation API. That's not to say you can't have an IsValidPrice method on the entity. However, I don't think it should be exposed as part of the public API. Consider the following:

namespace NinetyNineCentStore.Domain
{
    public class Product
    {
        public decimal Price { get; protected set; }
        public void SetPrice(decimal price)
        {
            ValidatePrice(price);
            Price = price;
        }
        internal static bool IsPriceValid(decimal price)
        {
            return IsPriceAtLeast99Cents(price) 
                && IsPriceAtMostNineteen99(price) 
                && DoesPriceEndIn99Cents(price);
        }
        private static bool IsPriceAtLeast99Cents(decimal price)
        {
            return (price >= 0.99m);
        }
        private static bool IsPriceAtMostNineteen99(decimal price)
        {
            return (price <= 19.99m);
        }
        private static bool DoesPriceEndIn99Cents(decimal price)
        {
            return (price % 1 == 99);
        }
        private static void ValidatePrice(decimal price)
        {
            if (!IsPriceAtLeast99Cents(price))
                throw new InvalidOperationException(
                    "Product price must be at least 99 cents.");
            if (!IsPriceAtMostNineteen99(price))
                throw new InvalidOperationException(
                    "Product price must be no greater than 19.99.");
            if (!DoesPriceEndIn99Cents(price))
                throw new InvalidOperationException(
                    "Product price must end with 99 cents.");
        }
    }
}

The above encapsulates validation on the entity, without exposing it in the API. Your factory can still invoke the internal IsPriceValid, but doesn't need to be concerned with every little business rule permutation. When any client, internal or public, tries to violate the rule, an exception is thrown.

This pattern might seem like overkill, but consider business rules that involve more than one property on an entity. For example, say you can break the DoesPriceEndIn99Cents rule when the Product.IsOnSale == true. You already have ValidatePrice encapsulated, so you can accommodate that rule without having to expose a new validation API method.

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Thanks for the clear and helpful answer. Some corollaries that I deduce: 1) The productfactory could have several overloads because not all the data may be available everytime 2) The main overload could have quite some parameters, but this should not be a problem because the task of the factory is clear. But of course we cannot pass a viewmodel as just 1 parameter to the productfactory, only because that would seem more convenient 3) Viewmodelfactories are part of the UI layer –  staccata Feb 6 '12 at 20:20
    
I deleted my second comment and placed it as 3) in the original question –  staccata Feb 6 '12 at 21:31

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