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I've been curious for a while with this now.

The css3 properties are not yet standardized, yet can be implemented by browsers, using a prefix for the particular browser. For example, border-radius can be used, and it works fine on modern browsers. However, for previous versions of the browser vendors, we can use the vendor specific properties like -moz, -webkit, etc. prefixes to work.

Now, for my page, I have used gradients and border-radius, made a couple of classes that use them and applied these classes throught.

Which of the following is better to do?

  1. Using javascript to find whether the support is there, and use the properties if they are supported, if above is false, check the user agent and apply vendor specific properties accordingly.

  2. Using all the browser prefixes in the classes and let the browser use whichever suits it.

What I am curious and concerned about, is the performance and time for DOM loading.

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You don't need prefixed for border-radius anymore. –  Šime Vidas Feb 6 '12 at 14:34
    
Disable JavaScript in your browser. Load your page. Is the rendering slow? If you can't spot any delay, you're fine. –  Šime Vidas Feb 6 '12 at 14:35
    
Even though it is not really required in Chrome, unluckily, I have a lot of people visiting my site who use Firefox 3.5.x, 3.6.x, which does require the -moz prefix –  Pranav 웃 Feb 6 '12 at 14:37
    
Note that browsers ignore properties with vendor prefixes other than their own. So, each browser has to process only one additional property. I don't think this can be a performance issue. Big sites like Facebook probably have several times more CSS rules than your site, and they're doing fine. –  Šime Vidas Feb 6 '12 at 14:49
    
Just went through the styles of google, interestingly google does use prefixes, though, I could find the mozilla prefix only 7 times and opera prefix 2 times in the whole code.Even StackOverflow seems to have mentioned the prefixes in the CSS itself, and there seem to be a couple of entries for it. –  Pranav 웃 Feb 6 '12 at 17:10
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Which of the following is better to do?

  1. Using javascript to find whether the support is there, and use the properties if they are supported, if above is false, check the user agent and apply vendor specific properties accordingly.

  2. Using all the browser prefixes in the classes and let the browser use whichever suits it.

Option 1 consists of using JavaScript to detect support, then conditionally writing out the CSS code with or without the prefixes and letting the browser apply the styles.

Option 2 consists of simply using CSS and relying on the browser to ignore prefixes/declarations it doesn’t understand.

As you can see, option 1 introduces an extra layer (JavaScript) which is not necessary if you just want to use some CSS3 features where possible. Option 2 will be the most performant solution.

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1  
performant isn't a word –  Diodeus Feb 6 '12 at 15:51
5  
@Diodeus i.imgur.com/XRFzs.jpg –  Mathias Bynens Feb 6 '12 at 16:40
    
@MathiasBynens, Usually when I go through code using chrome inspector, I do see the other browser prefixes in the css. Was not completely sure that it is completely ignored by the browser. –  Pranav 웃 Feb 6 '12 at 17:15
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As always with this kind of question, the answer is - it depends. It depends on which prefixes you're using, how often they occur in the HTML, which browser you're testing against, etc.

The solution is to write the code, profile it, and find out. Very often, you will find that the performance is acceptable either way.

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2  
Personally, I use Modernizr and style against the classes it adds. However, this might be quicker or slower depending on a lot of factors. HTML5Please gives a lot of advice about the new CSS3 elements. –  Blowski Feb 6 '12 at 14:43
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I use option 2 - add all the browser prefixes (as well as the non-prefixed version) to the CSS:

-webkit-border-radius: 10px;
-moz-border-radius: 10px;
border-radius: 10px;

Browsers will skip declarations they don't understand without any problems (although your CSS won't validate) while still applying the styles. It's probably best to use a CSS generator to avoid having to type out every prefix.

You should avoid using Javscript to detect CSS features since this breaks separation of concerns - CSS is for presentation and Javascript is for behaviour.

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