Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been doing a lot of reading about how using singleton classes is becoming bad practice in programming due to hidden dependencies, hard to test etc etc.

A lot of forum posts I have read have said that you can still maintain a singleton's main functionality of only allowing one instance without using the singleton pattern.

I wondered if anyone could give a practical example of this. A lot of posts have suggested using a factory class to create singleton instances where the dependencies are clearly shown. To me this just seems like taking multiple singletons and combining them into a single factory singleton which would have the same problems?

share|improve this question
6  
Singletons themselves are not intrinsically evil. Using them where you shouldn't, however, is, particularly if you're doing your own object lifecycle management (as opposed to using a DI container). Unless you need a FactoryFactory, why shouldn't a factory be a singleton? (This is more rhetorical, there are actual reasons, but they don't often matter.) –  Dave Newton Feb 6 '12 at 15:29
    
You know, when I use the Spring framework to manage my app cycle, all the beans it creates are singletons, and there is also only one ApplicationContext as well (Spring's main program). So singletons aren't bad, you just need to take care of the issues you mentioned (dependencies, testability, etc) –  Luciano Feb 6 '12 at 15:30
    
It might be beneficial to frame this question like a game-playing question: "are the worse possible scenarios for bad use of singletons better than the worse possible scenarios of simply calling new/making COMPLETELY static classes/etc"? The only reason I bring this up is because any pattern that can be used can probably be misused - so its worth the time to ask "which ones limit the worse possible outcomes" –  Dave Feb 6 '12 at 15:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem with the "singleton pattern" is really not with the singleton itself, but with the inflexible static factory method in the singleton class. And I believe that even in the GoF book, this was considered an example of how a singleton could be accessed, not the definitive implementation model.

A lot of posts have suggested using a factory class to create singleton instances where the dependencies are clearly shown. To me this just seems like taking multiple singletons and combining them into a single factory singleton which would have the same problems?

The difference is that this single factory then becomes the single point where you maintain dependencies.

And in fact, the generally accepted solution is to use a dependency injection framework like Spring or Guice which is basically such a single factory with a very powerful and flexible configuration mechanism which can do much more than just manage singletons.

share|improve this answer

The solution is usually to use dependency injection. This doesn't mean you have to have a framework, you just need to create instances and connect them together externally to your main code base. I use a module which depends on everything else which wires and configures all the components externally (to the components which are in other modules)

Using dependency injection, you have a singleton whenever you only create one instance.

Obviously, in tests, you can create many instances including sub-classes and mocks of interfaces.

share|improve this answer

A good practical example is the springframework. It creates beans by default as "singleton" (only one instance in the container), but there is no requirement that the programmer implement the pattern (private constructor, getInstance static method, etc.).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.